Tag Archives: KIBS

Bishop Paiute Tribe Faces Water Shortage

July 28th, 2020 – Inyo County – The Bishop Paiute Tribe is experiencing low water pressure reservation wide due to the high demand of water usage and minimal storage and pumping capacity.

The Bishop Paiute Reservation has six drinking water wells with two wells each located at PaMe Lane, Tibec Lane, and Siebu Lane. Currently three out of six wells are inoperable. With the temperatures rising, and more community members staying home due to the COVID-19 pandemic the water usage has gone up significantly.

The Public Works Department is working hard to secure funding and contracts to make the needed repairs and replacements for inoperable pumps and motors of the three wells. It is of highest priority to ensure our community has continuous safe drinking water.

The following restrictions apply to all residential, commercial, non-profit and Tribal entities. No use of the domestic water for any water users is allowed on Mondays. Even numbered addresses may water only on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays from 5:00am-10:00am and 5:00pm-10:00pm . Odd numbered addresses only water on Wednesday Friday and Sunday from 5:00am-10:00am and 5:00pm-10:00pm.These restrictions will be strictly enforced until further notice. The only exception to consider under these regulations is you may water any gardens and fruit trees as needed as long as it is not excessive. We encourage those that have access to irrigation or creeks to utilize those resources. If you have any questions or would like to report any violators, please do not hesitate to contact the Public Works office at 760-873-6638. We thank you for your cooperation in joining the team of conservation.

Updates will be available to the public as they occur on KBPT-LP 96.1fm at the top of the hour for breaking information and at 8am, 11am, 6pm and 11pm for cumulative information.

Northern Inyo Hospital Preparing for ‘Surge’ of COVID-19 Cases

Northern Inyo Hospital gave its weekly COVID-19 update on Monday afternoon, March 30, 2020, with Dr. Stacey Brown taking the lead in updating the media.

“We have eight total positive cases of COVID-19 in the county. Six of the eight cases were confirmed at NIHD, while Toiyabe confirmed the other two. In addition, thirteen of the eighty-one total tests administered are pending,” Brown told members of the media.

There is good news for Inyo County when it comes to testing. The Rural Health Clinic Director said the hospital is receiving coronavirus testing results from a LabCorp facility based in Phoenix, which will greatly reduce the amount of time it takes to determine if a patient has the virus. On average, test results will be available in 2-3 days. Up until recently, NIHD had to send their samples to a testing location in North Carolina, which took about seven days on average for the hospital to receive the results.

Brown also added that testing is expected to get even faster in the coming weeks when the FDA approves use of a high-tech machine called the “Cepheid Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV2 test.”

The RHC director spoke about the new machine saying, “The hospital is still waiting for approval for our in-house COVID testing machine that will be able to do tests in an hour. Approval for testing should happen by around mid-April.”

This does not mean that testing will be available for the general public. Brown says the new testing system will target essential workers first, then vulnerable populations second. “We are going to follow a priority scheme, so the testing for the general public is going to be reduced.  If it looks and smells like COVID, it is probably COVID, so we are not going to use those tests on general public. We are saving the tests for healthcare workers, first responders, and critically ill patients. They are priority number one. Next would be high risk individuals like people with underlying medical conditions and older people.”

Antibody testing is expected to be readily available across the country soon as well. This type of testing will be used to see if those who have already had COVID-19 have built up an immunity to the virus.

Inyo County already has its fair share of coronavirus cases, but Brown expects a surge of cases to happen in the near future. With that being said, Dr. Brown says the hospital is doing everything it can to prepare.  “We are looking at a surge plan for when things get much busier. Right now, though, we are working well within our capacity as a hospital.”

Though there is an expectation from local medical professionals that there will be a vast increase in cases, Dr. Will Timbers, who works in the hospital’s Emergency Room, says the general public is doing a nice job of staying home. This is lessening the amount of viral cases, and also preventing other acute injuries not related to coronavirus. “There are two things that I think should be said,” Timbers remarked. “I think the community at large should be commended for staying home. We have seen a drop in acute injuries also, because people are not going out and instead electing to stay home.”

Bishop Snap Losing Streak Against Boron

The Bishop Broncos blew out the Boron Bobcats for the second time this season Friday evening. The first meeting was a forty-one point route for Bishop. The final score of the game played a month ago was 69-28. Robert Chavez’s team put up 69 points in the second game as well. However, the final score in this game was a little bit closer with the match up ending 69-42.

Both teams played evenly throughout most of the first half. However, Bishop led the entire time, doing a nice job of sharing the ball and knocking down open looks.

Bishop’s standout player in the first quarter was Junior, Clay Omohundro, who drained back to back three pointers toward the start of the game. He scored eight points inside the first three minutes of the game.

The first half ended with Bishop holding on to a small lead. When the second half began, Bishop came out guns blazing. The Bronco’s lead quickly ballooned to a double-digit advantage early in the third quarter.

The star of the second half was undoubtedly Sophomore, Kenyan Piper, who was scoring at will inside the paint. There were many instances where Piper would receive the ball at the top of the arc and explode into the paint past the Boron rim protectors.

Bishop snapped a three-game losing streak with their victory against Boron. Up next for the Broncos, a pivotal match up against Kern Valley, who are one spot ahead of Bishop for third place in the High Desert League. If Bishop want any chance of hosting a home playoff game, they have to win tomorrow night.

IMACA Appoint New Executive Director

The IMACA Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Robert (Bob) Hughes has been appointed as IMACA’s new Executive Director beginning December 2, 2019. He will succeed Charles Broten, who is retiring after 5 ½ years with the Agency.

Mr. Hughes has professional experience in banking and was the President/CEO of the Thrift/Pan America Bank and Beneficial State Bank in Porterville CA. One of his key accomplishments there was developing relationships with auto and furniture dealers that required fair treatment of customers in order to participate in lending programs. He also adapted a business model to effectively serve low income and Spanish speaking communities.

Recently, Hughes worked as AmeriCorps Statewide Volunteer Infrastructure Project Leader in Napa Ca. He led a group of 130 + volunteers serving dozens of non-profit agencies in the State. He completed a 1700 hour service year with CalServes/AmeriCorps.

Carolyn Balliet, IMACA Chairperson, says, “IMACA has been extremely fortunate to have had Charlie Broten in recent years, working successfully to implement the goals of our Mission Statement and assist the managers to maximize their talents in serving the low income people in our Counties. We look forward to working with Bob Hughes to continue increasing the impact IMACA has in our community.”

Donations Sought for the Annual Eastern Sierra Shop with a Cop

Law enforcement officers and public safety staff from law enforcement and criminal justice agencies throughout Mono and Inyo Counties are busy planning the Annual Shop-with-a-Cop event, which will be held Saturday, December 14, 2019.

This is a very special day where our local law enforcement brings the true spirit of Christmas to families in need throughout the Eastern Sierra and Owens Valley. Children are selected by various local law enforcement agencies from nominations received by area schools, community groups and individuals. On Saturday morning, the children are picked up at their homes by their law enforcement “partners” and taken to pancake breakfast sponsored by the Bishop Lion’s Club. After breakfast, the officers and children respond Code 3 (lights and sirens) through Bishop to K-Mart to start their shopping extravaganza. Each child is given $200 to shop for gifts for their families. After all the gifts have been purchased, local volunteers wrap the gifts, and the officers and children travel home where an early holiday celebration begins!

Their goal for the 2019 Shop-with-a-Cop event is to provide Christmas to 70 children and their families. This event is completely donation driven. Let’s start getting into the holiday spirit and donate to this great event today! Donations can be dropped off at the Mono County Sheriff’s Office, Inyo County Sheriff’s Office, Bishop Police Department and Mammoth Lakes Police Department. Please make checks payable to ESPOA (Eastern Sierra Peace Officers Association) with “Shop-with-a-Cop” written in the memo line. ESPOA is a 501(c)3, and your donation is tax deductible.

Fatal Crash on Highway-6

On Wednesday, July 3, 2019, at approximately 12:05 AM, NHP Troopers were dispatched to a serious injury crash on US-6 and Mineral County mile marker 4, near Montgomery Pass, involving two commercial vehicles.

Preliminary investigation shows that a red 2010 Volvo tractor-trailer was traveling east on US-6, approaching Mineral County mile marker 4, in the single eastbound travel lane. For an unknown reason, the commercial vehicle left the roadway, re-entered the roadway, and overturned. The commercial vehicle came to rest across all travel lanes on its right side.

Approximately three minutes later, a red 2017 Peterbilt tractor-trailer was traveling eastbound on US-6, approaching the overturned Volvo tractor-trailer. The Peterbilt struck the Volvo, splitting the Volvo into two. The driver of the Peterbilt (Dario Baez, a 53-year-old Madera resident) succumbed to his injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Due to the extent of the debris, US-6 was closed for an extended period of time. Traffic was rerouted to the outside shoulder until all travel lanes were reopened at 2:50 PM.

The Nevada Highway Patrol is seeking additional witnesses to this crash. If you were a witness to this incident or have any information regarding this collision, please contact the Nevada Highway Patrol Multi-Disciplinary Investigation and Reconstruction Team (M.I.R.T.) at ncwmirt@dps.state.nv.us and reference NHP Case #190700180.

Terry Lee Gardner Obituary

Terry Lee Gardner, 74, passed away June 21, 2019 at Riverside Community Hospital. Terry was born on November 24, 1944, in San Bernardino, California.  He was a public servant, a community leader, a beloved brother and father, and a friend to many throughout California and beyond.

Terry worked as a Police Officer in Los Alamitos and Mammoth Lakes.  He was also a Deputy Sheriff for the Mono County Sheriff’s Department. He was proud to be elected to the first Mammoth Lakes Town Council. After his retirement from law enforcement,  he worked as the Security Director for the Gas Company Tower, which was one of the tallest buildings in Los Angeles. He then served on the San Bernardino County Fire Department, as a Fireman/EMT at Havasu Lake station.  He was a graduate of Bishop High School, where he was a standout member of the 1962 football team. He graduated from C.S.U. Long Beach, with a degree in Health Science.. Terry served in the U.S. Army from 1968-69, as a Military Policeman.

During his careers in public safety and local government, Terry worked tirelessly with youth and athletic programs, as well as in many community and fire safety programs.

He leaves an older brother, Sidney (Nancy) of Mission Viejo, younger brothers Ted, of Bishop, and Bob (Karen) of June Lake, and sister Beth (Steve) of Torrance. His daughter Natalie Potesta lives in Chicago with her husband and three grandchildren. His longtime partner Holly Jenkins was a great support to him for many years and during his final illnesses.

A memorial service will be held at Orange First Methodist Church at 10:00 A.M. on Saturday, August 10, 2019. and Terry will be interred at the Riverside National Veterans Cemetery at 11:00 A.M. on Friday August 9, 2019. Donations in his name may be made to the athletic programs at Bishop High School, to the Bishop First United Methodist Church Community Programs, or to the charity of ones choice.

BLM Bishop Field Office Issues Seasonal Fire Restrictions

BISHOP, Calif. – The Bureau of Land Management Bishop Field Office has issued seasonal fire restrictions for BLM-managed public lands in the Eastern Sierra effective Monday, July 1, due to increased wildland fire danger in the region. The restrictions will remain in effect until November 1, or until wildland fire conditions on public lands in the region improve.

Fire officials estimate that nearly 90 percent of wildland fires affecting BLM-managed public lands in California during the last decade have been human caused. Individuals who spark wildfires, intentionally or unintentionally, may be held responsible for fire suppression and property damage costs. Officials encourage the public to be extremely careful when recreating outdoors, to carry a shovel and water at all times, and to check weather forecasts and fire danger conditions before leaving home.

The following restrictions will remain in place until the risk of wildland fire in the Eastern Sierra subsides:

  • No campfires, charcoal or wood barbeques, or similar open flame fires, except within a designated campsite with a fire ring or fire pit specifically provided for such use in the following developed campgrounds: Tuttle Creek Campground, Goodale Creek Campground, Horton Creek Campground, Crowley Lake Campground and Pleasant Valley Pit Campground. Portable stoves burning gas, jelled petroleum or pressurized liquid fuel are allowed outside of developed campgrounds when used in accordance with a valid California Campfire Permit, available free at all BLM, Forest Service and Cal Fire offices or at www.preventwildfireca.org/Permits.
  • No tools powered by internal combustion engines off established roads, trails or parking areas (such as chainsaws or lawn mowers).
  • No smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building, or within the developed campgrounds listed above, or while stopped within an area at least five feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.
  • No motorized vehicles off established roads, trails or parking areas.
  • Target shooters may not use incendiary, exploding, tracer, steel core or armor piercing ammunition. Shooting at steel or exploding targets that could emit sparks is not allowed. Target shooters must have a shovel or fire extinguisher on hand. Hunters may use steel shot and other non-lead ammunition as required by California State Law.
  • No fireworks, including “safe and sane” fireworks.
  • No welding or operating an acetylene or other torch with open flame, except by special permit.
  •  No use of explosives, except by special permit.

BLM-managed public lands subject to these fire restrictions extend from the southern Owens Valley in Inyo County, north to Topaz Lake and the Nevada border in Mono County. These fire restrictions also apply to popular BLM-managed recreational areas in the region including the Alabama Hills National Scenic Area, Inyo Mountains Wilderness, Volcanic Tableland, Long Valley, Adobe Valley, Mono Basin, Bodie Hills and Slinkard Valley. BLM seasonal fire restrictions for the Eastern Sierra Region are being implemented in close coordination with Cal Fire (https://www.facebook.com/1663811310523258/posts/2419842918253423?sfns=mo).

The BLM is committed to keeping public landscapes healthy and productive by working closely with cooperating agencies, neighboring communities, and public land visitors to prevent wildland fires. To learn how you can do your part to prevent wildland fires visit www.readyforwildfire.org. A listing of fire restrictions throughout BLM California is available at https://go.usa.gov/xmUEG. For specific questions, please contact the Bishop Field Office at 760-872-5000.

Mono County Seek to Mitigate Wildlife Deaths With Grant Money

The Mono County Board of Supervisors expressed support in their letter to Caltrans District 9, and encourage the transportation organization to apply for funding which would help mitigate wildlife deaths from vehicles.

Proposition 68 is an ordinance that provides organizations with funding to help reduce the amount vehicle collisions with animals across the state.

Currently, Caltrans District 9 is requesting $2,000,000 from the state to complete the environmental planning report. In total, the cost of completing the entire project is estimated to cost between $50,000,000-$70,000,000.

Most of the funding would go toward the seven mile stretch from Crowley Lake and the Mammoth Lakes turnoff. “The seven mile stretch of US Highway 395 from Crowley Lake Dr. to the Junction with state route 203 accounts for more than double the number of deceased deer removed by Caltrans Maintenance forces compared to any other seven mile stretch of US 395 within District 9. The letter from the supervisors went on to say “This [area] accounts for 43% of reported collisions for this area of US 395, the stretch of highway also contains the largest hotspot of deer collisions within the district.”

Not only did the supervisors express concern for deer crossing the corridor, they also noted the presence of other species including the Bi-State sage grouse. The letter says, “The areas along these roadways host significant wildlife habitat, supporting populations of resident and migratory species, including the Bi-State sage grouse which is proposed to be listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, and play a critical role for migrating mule deer in the spring and fall.”

In order to obtain the rest of the necessary funding, Mono County will seek money from other state and federal agencies. “If awarded, funding will also allow Caltrans District 9 and their partners to seek additional state and Federal Funding to support the completion of subsequent project development phases.”

Carl Pearce Obituary

Carl Pearce was a cowboy, rodeo contestant, rancher, dude wrangler, horseman, chef, farmer, athlete, college graduate, soldier, aviator, coach, paratrooper, restaurateur, investment broker, Rotarian, insurance broker, family man, local philanthropist, cancer survivor, confidant, friend, father, husband, and self-made man.

Carl was born in Portland, Oregon on March 15, 1935 and passed away May 15, 2019. He graduated Bishop High school where he was actively involved with the agriculture program and where he excelled in football and basketball. He could consistently sink a basketball from half court and was often called upon in clutch situations to bring the team to a win. He participated in rodeo winning many awards, including the 1952 Bishop Homecoming calf roping contest and the wild cow riding championship at the Cow Palace in San Francisco.

After High School graduation Carl attended a year at Pierce Junior college where he played basketball. He transferred to UC Davis and graduated in 1958. He was in the top of his Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) program class which provided unique opportunities afforded to the best in the military. Carl entered the United States Army in 1958, and completed infantry training, along with Army Ranger, Airborne, and Aviation schools. While in the Army he married Arlene Brierly and they moved to Fort Lewis, Washington where Carl served with the 4th Aviation Division. He flew the tandem rotor H-21, known as the flying banana, and was the first group of Army aviators to transition from piston powered helicopters to turbine helicopters receiving training in the historic Huey Helicopter. He survived 3 helicopter accidents during his flying career. Two of those accidents were significant, and one was a minor accident. He flew helicopters in Alaska as part of the government’s concern over potential invasion by Russia through Alaska. Carl was honorably discharged from the Army as a Captain in 1963 when he returned to Bishop with his family Arlene, Mark, Hugh, and Rob to work for the Brierly Ranch.

Carl worked several years on the Brierly Ranch, farming, irrigating, and working cattle. During that time, he decided to move on to other opportunities and joined New York Life Insurance Company in 1966. He also later went into business with Johnny Morris at the Embers Restaurant. He was an agent with New York Life Insurance Company for 50 years. He achieved many awards with them over the years including President’s Council and Million Dollar Round Table.

Carl was actively involved in the local community through the Rotary Club where he served as President. He coached youth basketball and football, was involved with the Foundation for Excellence, and was in short “a huge part” of the local community. He served as Inyo County Cattlemen’s president and was a California Cattlemen’s Association Director. He gave freely of his time and money to many local causes and people in need.

Carl loved life, he enjoyed entertaining people at his home, dining with friends, and helping people in need. He relished fine dining and a good glass of wine. He loved animals; his Emmy Lou and Rachel were his constant companions.

He was proceeded in death by his son Hugh Pearce, grandparents Thurman and Grace Wilkerson, father Frank Pearce, mother Alma Mack, step father Gerald Mack, step mother Macel Pearce, and brothers Frank and Stan. He is survived by his wife of 59 years Arlene; sons Rob and Mark; daughter in-law Lee Ann; siblings Eddie and Anne; nieces and nephews Vickie, Cole, and Joan; grandchildren Mario and Marina, and many other cousins and shirt tail relatives.

Special thanks go to Crystal, Norma, Silvia, and Lala, who helped care for Carl in the last part of his life when he was in ill health. Special thanks to Terri Dean for many years working with Carl and being a close part of the family. They all are part of the family.

Carl lived an honorable and good life. He was the epitome of a self-made man. He came from very humble beginnings, worked hard to obtain an education, and built a successful business, raised a family, served his country and community, and was a good friend to many. He will be missed.

Graveside services will be held at the Pioneer (West Line Street) Cemetery, Wednesday May 29, at 11 AM. A reception lunch will follow. The reception location to be announced at the service. The family requests in lieu of flowers donations be made in Carl’s memory to the Laws Railroad Museum (Bishop Museum and Historical Society), P.O. Box 363; Bishop, CA 93514.