Tag Archives: KIBS BISHOP

Donald Metivier Obituary

It is with a heavy hearts that the Metivier Family announce the passing of our beloved husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather Donald W. Metivier. “Dad,” entered the Lord’s presence, peacefully late afternoon on August 9, 2020, at the age of 93.

He was born January 25, 1928 in Manitowoc, WI, to parents Ernestine and Willard Metivier. Enlisted in the U.S. Army after graduating from Lincoln High School in 1946.

Worked as a Corporal in the regular Army, Classification Specialist for the Department of the Adjutant General, at Fort Lawton, WA. In charge of interviewing, debriefing and giving aptitude tests of soldiers returning from overseas and re-enlistees after the end of World War II. Decorated World War II Victory Medal and under the G.I. Bill benefit, attended Michigan State University. Graduated in 1952 Bachelor of Science Degree in Forestry and a minor in engineering.

Met the love of his life, Patricia, at MSU equestrian class. Began a career with the Forest Service at Lassen National Park, CA, before moving to Tillamook and Cannon Beach, OR. Cape Lookout State Park and Collier State Parks, preforming duties as a park ranger.

Continued an impressive second career as a Design Engineer for Aeronutronic Division of Ford Aerospace in Newport Beach, CA, in 1955, relocated to Santa Ana, CA. Retired in 1989, before moving to Chalfant Valley, CA.

Lived a full life raising eight children and loved art, theater, music, travelling, mountaineering, backpacking, and camping with family. Climbed over 250 peaks in the western US, loved the Sierra Nevada, and the Rockies. Avid ice hockey and football fan.

Donald is preceded in death by sons, Daniel, James, and infant Joseph. He is survived by wife of 67 years, Patricia, daughters, Michelle, Yvonne, and Nannette, sons, Patrick, Thomas, and Paul, numerous grandchildren, and great grandchildren.

Faithful member of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Catholic Church, Bishop, CA. Funeral mass to be determined. The family requests your prayers and well wishes. In lieu of flowers, perhaps a donation to favorite charity in Donald’s name. Thank you.

NIH Opioid Discussion Helps Families Cope With Addiction

Northern Inyo Rural Health Clinic hosted a discussion about Opioid addiction on Wednesday. The discussion was titled, “How to Help a Family Member With an Opioid Addiction.”

The focus of this discussion was to provide a better understanding of how to better comprehend how addiction manifests itself in a person, and how family and friends can work together to support a loved one who is struggling with a dependency.

About twenty people attended the event. The audience actively participated in the event. Many asked questions and participated in an open dialogue with experts. In total, the event last just over two hours.

Dr. Anne Goshgarian spoke to attendees about the brain chemistry of addiction entails, while Arlene Brown of the Northern Inyo Rural Health Clinic focused on how to support those suffering from addiction. Brown said, “An important topic that we addressed was reducing the stigma around addiction. It was a great community event which empowered friends and family to be better able to help someone struggling with addiction. To me, that was the greatest message on the evening because friends and family can often times feel helpless in those situations.”

Both women answered questions relating to what the warning signs of addiction are, the type of drugs that are in the community, what the difference is in most Opioids, and how to identify if a person is overdosing.

The experts also handed out Opioid Overdose Reversal Kits and discussed treatment options available at Northern Inyo Hospital.

Mono County Civic Center in Mammoth Close to Completion

MAMMOTH LAKES, Calif. – The new Mono County Civic Center office building in Mammoth Lakes is in the final phase of construction and is projected to be ready for occupancy in spring 2020.  Located on Sierra Park Road between Mammoth Hospital and the Mammoth Lakes Police Department, the new Civic Center brings essential County services under one roof, providing easier, centralized access to programs and offices, and a professional setting for public meetings.

 

Construction of the 33,000 square foot building began just ten months ago in April 2019 and followed an ambitious schedule. The projected opening reflects a slight delay from the original projected completion goal of March 2020.

 

Stacy Corless, Chair of the Mono County Board of Supervisors and District 5 Supervisor, applauded the efforts of the entire team: “Everyone involved in this complex and demanding project, including the general contractor, subcontractors, consultants and County staff, has been working tirelessly and the finish line is in sight.”

 

District 1 Supervisor Jennifer Kreitz pointed out that many factors worked in favor of staying on track, including a summer and fall season that was fortuitously warm and dry. “Given the construction challenges faced by any project of this magnitude, particularly at higher elevations, it’s very commendable that we are just shy of the original target.”

Though the construction schedule is approximately two weeks behind at present, County leaders recognize that finishing the project and moving numerous offices will take time, and that the extra time needed for project completion and the move will likely present the need for some County departments to work out of temporary office spaces. Supervisor Corless emphasized that “the most important focus of this move is to maintain vital public services and minimize disruption, as well as to ensure a transition for County employees—and the people they serve—that is efficient, cost-effective and secure.”

 

To that end, County Administrative Officer Steve Barwick said that County staff is finalizing plans to ensure that all public services continue with minimal interruption in a safe, secure and convenient location.  If temporary office space is necessary for the transition, Mono County’s priorities will be to use available space in the Minaret Mall as well as existing office space in Bridgeport.  The County may also temporarily lease additional space as necessary.

While Mono County has a relatively flexible lease arrangement at the Minaret Mall, the lease at the Sierra Center Mall terminates definitively at the end of March 2020.  Barwick stated, “Despite what is anticipated to be a short delay for move-in to our new building, Mono County is committed to vacating the currently leased space in the Sierra Center Mall by March 31 as the owners are ready to move forward with their plans to redevelop the site into an exciting new hotel property.”

Once open this spring, the Civic Center will be the new home for Social Services, Behavioral Health, Public Health, Environmental Health, District Attorney, Probation, County Counsel, Information Technology, Economic Development, Community Development as well as offices for County Administration and a meeting room for the Board of Supervisors.  Supervisor Corless noted that “the centralized location of the Civic Center, and the fact that all our departments are together in one building, will improve efficiencies in the delivery of County services to the public and will ultimately result in significant cost savings.”

 

The Board of Supervisors will receive an update on the Civic Center project on January 21, and at subsequent public meetings over the next two months. For more information about the Mono County Civic Center, please visit https://www.monocounty.ca.gov/facilities/page/mono-county-civic-center-mammoth-lakes or contact Steve Barwick, Mono County Administrative Officer.

Bishop City Council Vote to Protect Renters with Emergency Ordinance

The Bishop City Council voted 5-0 in favor of adopting an emergency ordinance that will prohibit landlords from dramatically increasing rent on tenants and evicting residents without just cause. The city ordinance is in response to a loophole created by AB 1482, which is designed to protect tenants from egregious hikes in an individual’s monthly rent. However, from now until January 1, 2020, landlords had the option to dramatically increase rent before the ordinance was made official.

Mayor Pro Tempore, Laura Smith spoke about the possible rental hikes saying, “We are not looking to handcuff landlords by passing this ordinance. There is a drastic shortage of housing in the area, and people are probably not going to find a place to live. We don’t want people kicked out of their homes with the cold weather and no place to go.”

Councilman, Stephen Muchovej expressed similar feelings, indicating that the council’s job is to help its citizens. “We are here to help people out in town. We should prevent these sort of scenarios [subjecting tenants to rental hikes] from happening.”

Bishop resident Steve Seats, who was previously evicted from his home at the Primrose Lane Apartments in town due to a rent increase, spoke to the city council and expressed his feelings on the matter.

“It sickens me when I heard that over forty families were at risk of being evicted from their homes.” Seats said.

Seats, who now says he lives in his car and spends most nights in the parking lot adjacent to the City of Bishop Council Chambers, also told the public about his experience of allegedly being harassed by a member of the Bishop Police Department since being evicted from his apartment.

“Last night an officer threatened to arrest me for sleeping in my car in the parking lot.” Seats said. “The officer became progressively more and more aggravated when I did not comply. The behavior was inappropriate by the police force.”

Shortly after Seats spoke, Mayor Jim Ellis gave his thoughts on the ordinance saying, “This ordinance is to protect our citizens.” Ellis also added that the housing market makes things difficult for low-income individuals. “We have a tough housing market here. I don’t think any of us have a problem with voting in favor of an ordinance.”

Laws Museum Appoint New Museum Administrator

The Board of Directors of Laws Museum is pleased to announce the selection of Raven Angeles as our museum Administrator. Since beginning her employment as office manager in May 2019, Ms. Angeles has consistently met the highest professional standards in her position. Her bookkeeping and office management expertise is matched by her problem solving skills and her dedication to do what is best for the museum, staff, volunteers, and visitors. The Board of Directors looks forward to a new and exciting future for Laws Museum with Raven Angeles on the team as our Administrator!

When you visit Laws Museum, what you experience is the result of the many years Howard Holland has dedicated to the museum as our Exhibits Manager. At the October meeting of the board of directors Howard Holland announced his retirement and his intention to “pass the torch” to Katie Olson. We are thrilled to announce Katie Olson has accepted the position of Exhibits Manager. Katie was elected to the Laws Railroad Museum & Historical Site Board of Directors in June after retiring from a thirty eight year career with Walt Disney Imagineering. Katie brings a wealth of experience to the Laws Railroad Museum and we are excited about her new role at the museum.

Please join us in congratulating Katie and Raven on their new positions!

Funds Pour in for Fuel Reduction Projects in Mammoth

In March of 2019, the Mammoth Lakes Fire Safe Council was awarded a $1,000,000 grant from the Sierra Nevada Conservancy (SNC) to complete the Lakes Basin Hazardous Fuels Reduction Project (‘project’). The ‘project’ provides valuable fuel reduction treatment on 630 acres in the Mammoth Lakes Basin to reduce wildfire risk, improve forest health and protect the watershed. The contractor’s proposed cost of the project resulted in an $181,275 deficit. The following agencies recently made significant financial contributions to support the project’s completion:

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power ($60,425) Mono County ($30,425) Town of Mammoth Lakes ($60,425) Edison International – a parent company of Southern California Edison ($30,000)

“I am grateful these agencies and SNC recognized the importance of this project” stated Dave Easterby, MLFSC president. “The success of this project will be recognized by their financial contribution, along with the tireless efforts from volunteer individuals, including our primary grant writer, Matthew Diener, MLFSC Director at Large. We’re fortunate to be working with dedicated like-minded individuals within a community of supportive agencies.”

“This project’s success demonstrates the power in multi-agency collaboration and what volunteer groups can accomplish.” Juliana Jones, Secretary of MLFSC, continued “I am grateful so many entities, who care about the safety of our community, came together to provide financial contributions to this regional support effort.”

The Lakes Basin Hazardous Fuels Reduction Project will be completed in Fall of 2020. 568 acres were completed this season, providing valuable protection to the Mammoth Lakes Community. Inyo National Forest, Mammoth Community Water District and Mammoth Lakes Fire Protection District supported the ‘project’ development and grant administration. The MLFSC is thankful for the overwhelming support received by the community and recent financial contributions from other local agencies.

High Winds Rip Down Trees and Turnover Semi-Truck

A wind prohibition for trucks was issued at 12:22 PM on May 16 after sustained 40 mile per hour winds with gusts as high as 80 miles per hour.

Originally, the prohibition existed from Bishop to Lone Pine by a CHP Officer in the area, but it was determined necessary to implement the ban all the way down to Pearsonville.

There has been damage to trees along the entire corridor, as well as damage to vehicles.

One vehicle which sustained major damage was a semi-truck driving in the Fort Independence Travel Plaza area. The sixteen-wheeler sustained a large amount of destruction to the front side after it overturned on the shoulder of the road. The vehicle’s hood was torn off after the accident.

According to Bishop Area CHP, no injuries were sustained during the rollover.

Former Corporal in Sheriff’s Department Arrested

Former Inyo County Sheriff’s Department Corporal Nick Vaughn was arrested today by Investigators from the Inyo County District Attorney’s office on charges stemming from an alleged misappropriation of public funds.

 

After an internal investigation, the Sheriff’s Department referred the case to the District Attorney’s office for a criminal investigation.  After a lengthy investigation, a criminal complaint has been filed charging Mr. Vaughn with misappropriating over $10,000.00 that had been collected by him from participants in the Sheriff’s Department Work Release Program.  Participants in the program are required to pay certain fees to the Department, and it is alleged that a portion of those fees were diverted to Mr. Vaughn’s personal use or the use of other individuals.  Mr. Vaughn was the supervisor of the Work Release Program from approximately May, 2014 to March, 2018.

 

At this time, no other employees of the Sheriff’s Department are implicated in the investigation.

 

Mr. Vaughn was booked at the Inyo County Jail.  Bail on the arrest warrant was set at $15,000.00.

 

The District Attorney reminds the public that a defendant in any criminal case is presumed to be innocent until the contrary is proved beyond a reasonable doubt.

Wildlife Safety Bill Passes in California, Allowing the Consumption of Roadkill

The Inyo County Board of Supervisors approved correspondence for an act that will improve collaboration and documentation between agencies when accounting for wildlife deaths due to vehicles.

Senate bill 395, also known the Wildlife Safety act will provide better options for those who hit wildlife.

Currently, organizations such as CDFW, Caltrans, and CHP do not coloborate when it comes to documenting wildlife involved in accidents. With the new bill, the hope is that combined statistics will lead to less wild animal fatalities.

Another component of this measure will address what happens to a wounded or dead animal on the road. Currently, it is illegal to transport a dead wild animal. With the passing of this new law, animal carcasses can be moved and even donated.

The policy would allow for the meat of dead animals to be given to charities or prisons to feed people if it is deemed acceptable to consume. Some homeless shelters and prisons accept this type of meat for use in their pantry.

However, the meat is non-FDA approved, but depending on the injury, it can be deemed “safe for consumption.”

California’s Roadkill Bill was created by state senator Bob Archuleta, who said the measure would save “hundreds of thousands of pounds of healthy meat” from roadkill by using it to “feed those in need.”

Other states with similar laws include Oregon, Alaska, Colorado, Washington, North Dakota, Arizona, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Kansas, and Florida.

Numerous DUI Arrests Processed During Holiday Period

From December 28th to January 1st, the California Highway Patrol conducted a Maximum Enforcement Period (MEP) focusing on impaired driving. During this time, all available officers were on duty, conducting traffic stops and enforcing the law on the highways throughout California.

There were a number of arrests for DUI’s, for the CHP Inland Division. The Inland Division includes the areas of the Inland Empire, Bridgeport, and Bishop.

California Highway Patrol arrested 96 individuals who were driving under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance in the Inland Division Area. The numbers are up from last year, with 93 arrests occurring during the maximum enforcement period. Additionally, out of the 96 arrests, three were fatal.

Although a substantial amount of people were arrested in the Inland Empire for impaired driving, the numbers were much better when it comes to the Eastern Sierra. There were zero arrests for DUI’s in the Bishop area this year, and only one last year.

The Bridgeport district assisted Mammoth Lakes Police Department during the MEP in the town of Mammoth Lakes, which hosted over 15,000 visitors between December 28th through January 1st. CHP Bridgeport processed 3 DUI’s, while Mammoth Lakes Police Department arrested three more people for driving under the influence. Two out of the three arrests made by Mammoth Lakes Police involved vehicle collisions, however, none of the collisions involved major injuries.