Tag Archives: Northern Inyo Hospital

L-R: NIH Auxiliary President Judy Fratella, Auxiliary members Sharon Thompson, VFW Sr. Vice Commander and NIH Auxiliary member John Underhill, Auxiliary members Sharon Moore, Adie Zaragoza, Cathy Bahm, Diane Remick, Nona Jones, Shirley Stone, Carole Harris, June Wilkins, Carole Sample and Grad Wilkins, and NIH CEO Victoria Alexander-Lane. Photo courtesy Northern Inyo Hospital

NIH honors Clara Armstrong

NIH Auxiliary pay tribute to Clara Armstrong

A memorial plaque honoring Clara Hofer Armstrong, a 22-year member of the Northern Inyo Hospital Auxiliary, was recently unveiled at the hospital’s Healing Garden before Armstrong’s family, friends and fellow Auxiliary members.

Armstrong handled several Auxiliary jobs including maintaining the archives, serving on the auditing and bylaws committee, working disaster drills, giving hospital tours and serving as a model in a fashion luncheon. One of Armstrong’s favorite jobs was working in the Auxiliary’s gift shop.

Instrumental in raising money to help the Auxiliary purchase the ABUS (Automated Breast Ultrasound) mammography machine, Armstrong took pride in knowing the Bishop was one of the few hospitals in the country to have this machine. In all, the Auxiliary donated $45,000 toward the machine’s purchase.

Armstrong’s vibrant personality balanced her dedication to the all-volunteer Auxiliary, and that as much as her work, cemented her place in the Auxiliary’s history and hearts. “Clara was admired by Auxiliary members and always returned the love,” said Judy Fratella, Auxiliary president. “No one ever heard a harsh word about her or from her.”

The Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 8988 was on hand for the ceremony as well since Armstrong served as a United States Army nurse during World War II.  Armstrong died last September at the age of 97.   Members from Armstrong’s family in attendance included her daughters Marjorie Parsons and Marilyn Jackson, and their families. Armstrong’s son, James, who lives in New York, was present in spirit.

L-R: NIH Auxiliary President Judy Fratella, Auxiliary members Sharon Thompson, VFW Sr. Vice Commander and NIH Auxiliary member John Underhill, Auxiliary members Sharon Moore, Adie Zaragoza, Cathy Bahm, Diane Remick, Nona Jones, Shirley Stone, Carole Harris, June Wilkins, Carole Sample and Grad Wilkins, and NIH CEO Victoria Alexander-Lane. Photo courtesy Northern Inyo Hospital
L-R: NIH Auxiliary President Judy Fratella, Auxiliary members Sharon Thompson, VFW Sr. Vice Commander and NIH Auxiliary member John Underhill, Auxiliary members Sharon Moore, Adie Zaragoza, Cathy Bahm, Diane Remick, Nona Jones, Shirley Stone, Carole Harris, June Wilkins, Carole Sample and Grad Wilkins, and NIH CEO Victoria Alexander-Lane. Photo courtesy Northern Inyo Hospital
L-R: The family of Clara Armstrong: grandson Danny Parsons, son-in-law Chuck Parsons, daughters Marjorie Parsons and Marilyn Jackson, granddaughter-in-law Arlene Parsons and great-granddaughter, Savannah Parsons. Photo courtesy Northern Inyo Hospital
L-R: The family of Clara Armstrong: grandson Danny Parsons, son-in-law Chuck Parsons, daughters Marjorie Parsons and Marilyn Jackson, granddaughter-in-law Arlene Parsons and great-granddaughter, Savannah Parsons. Photo courtesy Northern Inyo Hospital
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Parkinson’s Disease Presentation

Dr. Douglas Will to discuss Parkinson’s

Douglas Will, MD, a neurologist at Northern Inyo Hospital, will present a discussion on the cause, diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s Disease.  This informative talk, set for Wednesday, June 17, 6 p.m., is open to the public and is free of charge. It will be held at the Highlands Mobile Home Park, 1440 McGregor Ave., Bishop.

Parkinson’s disease is a chronic and progressive movement disorder, meaning that symptoms continue and worsen over time. According to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, nearly one million people in the U.S. are living with Parkinson’s Disease. The cause is unknown, and although there is presently no cure, there are treatment options such as medication and surgery to manage its symptoms.

cover photo, Dr Douglas Will.

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Ungersma Honored

Ungersma named Trustee of Year

John Ungersma, MD, was named Healthcare District Trustee of the Year by the Association of California Healthcare Districts (ACHD) during the group’s annual conference last week in Monterey, Calif.

Dr. Ungersma has served on the Northern Inyo Hospital (NIH) Board of Trustees for 12 years. During that time he has held the positions of President, Vice President and Director at Large.  In his tenure on the board, Dr. Ungersma has led or participated in:

  • Planning, financing and construction oversight of a new 25-bed Critical Access Hospital
  • Recruiting a new Chief Executive Officer for the District
  • Increasing physician recruitment to assure access to both primary and specialty care
  • Establishing the Hospital’s Community Action Committee

Understanding that finances are frequently a barrier to educational advancement, Dr. Ungersma has personally — and quietly — provided college scholarship support for graduating high school seniors annually for the past 30 years.

Dr. Ungersma served as a Naval Flight Surgeon and Senior Surgeon with the First Marine Division in Desert Shield as well as Desert Storm; his military career spans 48 years, 21 years of active duty and 27 in active reserve in the Marine Corps as well as the Navy. A pioneer in many ways, Dr. Ungersma was the first Orthopedic Surgeon to establish a practice in Bishop.

Dr. Ungersma received his Medical Degree from the University of Southern California and he completed his Orthopedic Residency at St. Mary’s Hospital in San Francisco.  Dr. Ungersma is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Surgery at F. Edward Herbert School of Medicine in Bethesda Maryland; his orthopedic career includes participating in the training of 45 orthopedic residents, two of which have become Professors of Orthopedic Surgery.

In addition to his work locally, Dr. Ungersma has served on the ACHD Executive Board for the past few years.  He has served as Treasurer and this past year as Vice President.  While he has termed out for the ACHD board, he will remain active with the organization, working with its various committees.

Dr. Ungersma was nominated for this honor by NIH Board President MC Hubbard.

submitted by Northern Inyo Hospital

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Dianne Stevens and Kathy Decker. Photo provided by NIH

NIH honors Nurse Dianne Stevens

NIH honors Dianne Stevens

Northern Inyo Hospital kicked off National Nurses week with an awards presentation Wednesday morning. Hospital staff and management started the day with the presentation of the Daisy Award, which honors extraordinary nurses. This years winner is emergency room nurse, Dianne Stevens. Stevens was caught off guard by the award, as she though she was attending a routine safety meeting, only to be pushed into the spotlight as the Daisy Award winner. A very gracious Stevens accepted the award in front of a large gathering of co-workers, saying, “I think its outstanding to be recognized, but like my manager said, I think every nurse has the potential to be a Daisy Nurse.”
This is the 4th year of the Daisy award at Northern Inyo Hospital, previous winners include, Christine Hanley (2012), Joey Zappia (2013), and Deborah Earls (2014). Stevens was humble in joining the ranks of NIH Daisey Nurses. Stevens, a emergency room nurse stresses two key qualities in providing quality care, “Teamwork and communication. But we would not have that unless we have our patients who obviously believe in us to give good quality care and make a differences in their recovery.”
Both NIH CEO Victoria Alexander Lane and Chief Nursing Officer Kathy Decker praised not only Stevens but all the nurses at NIH for their extraordinary level of care.
Congratulations to Dianne Stevens, NIH Daisy Award winner.

Dianne Stevens and Kathy Decker. Photo provided by NIH
Dianne Stevens and Kathy Decker. Photo provided by NIH
award presentation at NIH lobby, photo by Arnie Palu
award presentation at NIH lobby
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Packed House at NIH meeting

Full room, tough talk at NIH board meeting

The great room at the Jill Kinmont Boothe school was full for last nights meeting of the Northern Inyo Hospital Board. The regular meeting was moved to the JKBS school this moth to provide adequate seating, something that was lacking at the boards prior meeting. Long time board member Pete Watercott apologized for not having enough capacity at the prior meeting.

This months meeting opened with a strong statement by Dr. Mike Phillips.  The emergency room doctor opened the public comment period by describing a splintered staff, that has broken into separate camps. Dr. Phillips also strongly criticized Chief Executive Officer Victoria Alexander Lane’s performance, noting a “lack of leadership, failure to do her job, and ruling with fear”.

Several other spoke during the public comment period expressing concern over the work environment.  Dr. Michael Dillon called for an establishment of a  working group to help face the current issues at Northern Inyo.

In regards to action at the meeting, the board listened to a long discussion about the Employee Complaints and Grievance Process Policy.  After a long discussion, the policy was tabled for further review, and will be back for potential action at next months meeting.

Dr. Thomas Boo, chief of staff announced he was stepping down as chief of staff. In giving a reason for stepping down, Dr Boo said, “Due to a dysfunctional relationship with administration.”

Chief Executive Officer Victoria Alexander Lane’s report included a positive update in regards to physician recruitment.  Alexander Lane noted the hiring of a new pediatrician who will be arriving from Massachusetts and also announced the hiring of Dr Felix Karp as a hospitalist.

Alexander Lane also updated the board on the hospitals strategic plan, detailing a wide variety of strategies for improvement, ranging from service prices to community outreach.

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Members are (l to r) Susan Tonelli (ER), Heleen Welvaart (Med Surg), Denise Morrill (ER), Betty Wagoner (RHC), Anneke Bishop (OB), Kathleen Schneider (Med Surg), Christine Hanley (Med Surg), Maura Richman (OB), Cynthia McCarthy (ICU), and Laurie Archer (PACU).  Not present: Gloria Phillips (PACU), and Eva Judson (OB).

NIH Employees Organize Union

Northern Inyo Hospital Employees Organize Union

Statement form the Northern Inyo Hospital Union Organizing Committee:

Registered Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, and Physician Assistants at Northern Inyo Hospital are organizing a union as part of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees. We are doing this to maintain the care and safety of our patients, to retain experienced staff and nurture new nurses in a safe culture, to be involved in NIH’s financial stability, and to support the other employees at the hospital who are part of our team.

Northern Inyo Hospital is a community hospital with a history of great patient care. We frequently hear from patients, “I never get this level of care and attention down south.” We provide safe care with a low rate of infection and adverse events. It is an entire team of workers who provide this care, from the person that greets you at the front desk to the doctor making a life-saving diagnosis.

That team is under great pressure. Patient care needs and documentation requirements are increasing without an increase in time allowed to provide care. Having the time to hold the hand of a dying patient, to comfort a sick child, or to help a mother bring a baby safely into the world, cannot be measured in a cost/benefit ratio.

We have lost experienced caregivers because of the policy of terminating employees whose treatment for a major medical diagnosis like cancer extends beyond 16 weeks. Nurses have left because they were not allowed the scheduling flexibility to maintain a balance between work and family. Caregivers are wondering if they will have the financial stability to remain in this area where they have homes and families.

For the past decade financial pressures have been tightening on the hospital. Friends tell us they go elsewhere for care because of the cost locally. Our current administration is addressing our financial future in a proactive manner, increasing patient census, and cutting the cost of procedures and lab work. CEO Victoria Alexander-Lane’s proposals for a strategic plan have merit, but she has not had enough input from the caregivers who will be on the front line implementing changes in delivering patient care.

The decision to form a union was not an easy one. Northern Inyo Hospital is the last major employer in the county without a union to provide a voice for employees. We will be negotiating, not for special treatment for union members, but for fair treatment for everyone, with a guiding principle of maintaining excellent and safe care of patients.

 Members are (l to r) Susan Tonelli (ER), Heleen Welvaart (Med Surg), Denise Morrill (ER), Betty Wagoner (RHC), Anneke Bishop (OB), Kathleen Schneider (Med Surg), Christine Hanley (Med Surg), Maura Richman (OB), Cynthia McCarthy (ICU), and Laurie Archer (PACU).  Not present: Gloria Phillips (PACU), and Eva Judson (OB).
Members are (l to r) Susan Tonelli (ER), Heleen Welvaart (Med Surg), Denise Morrill (ER), Betty Wagoner (RHC), Anneke Bishop (OB), Kathleen Schneider (Med Surg), Christine Hanley (Med Surg), Maura Richman (OB), Cynthia McCarthy (ICU), and Laurie Archer (PACU). Not present: Gloria Phillips (PACU), and Eva Judson (OB).
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City of Bishop Mourns Loss of Retired Judge, Patrick Canfield

Community Mourns After Passing of Retired Judge, Patrick Canfield (Age 67)

The Inyo County coroners office confirms retired Judge Patrick Canfield passed away Tuesday. Just prior to noon yesterday, Canfield, age 67, was involved in a minor traffic accident and transported to Northern Inyo Hospital.

According to the California Highway Patrol accident report, Canfield was driving eastbound on west line street near Grandview drive when, “Due to a medical Problem” lost control of the vehicle striking a utility box and wooden fence.

Canfield’s wife, Dori was a passenger in the vehicle and was not injured. Judge Canfield was transported to Bishop’s Northern Inyo Hospital by Symons ambulance, where he was later pronounced dead.

Canfield served as a Judge in Inyo county for over 20 years. When reached for comment, current Judge Dean Stout said, “The death of Pat Canfield is a devastating loss, he was a phenomenal Judge, a mentor, and a close friend.” Prior to serving as Judge, Canfield also worked in the Inyo County district attorneys office.

Services are currently pending.

 

Update: A memorial service will be held 1:00 PM, Tuesday, August 26, 2014 at the First Methodist Church in Bishop.

 

Community Mourns After Passing of Retired Judge, Patrick Canfield (Age 67)

http://www.kibskbov.com/bishop-mourns-retired-judge/

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