Tag Archives: Inyo County

tractor gary

Water fight!

Tech Group looks at water cuts

The Inyo County/Los Angeles department of water and power technical group met Monday morning in Bishop to discuss potential cuts to “in valley” water uses that would spare water for irrigation. The meeting included an update on the grim runoff projections with the LADWP letting everyone know that they will not export any water from the Owens Valley into Los Angeles during the first half of the 2015-2016 runoff year, and most likely not until November, 2015. Noting that for the entire runoff year only 42,400 acre feet will be exported. This is due to the fourth consecutive year of extreme drought. How ugly is the picture?…the LADWP estimates this years runoff to be just 36% of normal, compared to 52% last year.

The grim runoff picture means less water will be available for in valley uses, including irrigation and court ordered enhancement/mitigation projects. A major portion of Mondays meeting focused on potential areas where water could be saved to make sure irrigation to local lessee continues. On April 27th the LADWP had written ranchers notifying them that all irrigation would end on May 1st, that order was later lifted for lands in the Bishop cone. At the time the LADWP’s spokesperson Amanda Parsons said, “Collaboration with local partners” will allow the LADWP flexibility with how they distribute water for in-valley uses.

On Monday, officials discussed several areas where water could be shifted. The areas discussed included cuts to Klondike Lake, Goose Lake, Owens dry lake and the Lower Owens River Project (LORP). Any potential cuts would have to be approved by both the Inyo Board of Supervisors and LA officials, and any adjustments to the LORP would have to be cleared by those in the MOU group. Also the State lands commission and the Great Basin Unified Air Pollution control district would have a voice in any adjustments to water going on the dry lake.

Other meeting notes:
Wilkerson Rancher Gary Gilbert is claiming the LADWP violated the long term water agreement when they cut water to his Wilkerson lease. The DWP said their action to cut irrigation was not a violation.

Daris Moxley questioned why the McNally Ponds mitigation project has only received water 7 times since 1991.

Sally Manning questioned the accuracy of testing being done at well 385 located near 5 Bridges Road north of Bishop. Manning spoke passionately about the wells negative effect on fish slough.

Allan Bacoch from the Big Pine tribe noted that the Big Pine area is “being pumped heavily and there are clear impacts.”

And a representative from the Lone Pine tribe noted that pumping has dropped ground water levels 10 feet in the past year.

The discussion will continue at Tuesdays Inyo Board of Supervisors meeting and Thursday at the Standing Committee meeting.  The Standing Committee meeting will begin at 10am at the Lone Pine Visitors Center for a field trip to the Owens Dry Lake and Lone Pine High School Farm, then reconvene at the Board Room at 1pm.

cover photo by Gary Young. www.garyyoungphotography.com

ladwp, eastern sierra news, drought 2015, inyo county
sunset2

Ranch water will flow

LADWP will not cut irrigation water

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power has rescinded a proposed irrigation water cut off to Owens Valley lessees. Just prior to Tusday’s Inyo supervisors water workshop word came down of the LADWP’s proposal to cut water to local ranchers May 1st due to the severity of this year’s record drought. Now May 1st has arrived and LADWP spokesperson Amanda Parsons is confirming that the water will continue to flow to local ranchers. Parsons credits the “Collaboration with local partners” for allowing the LADWP flexibility with how they distribute water for invalley uses. The LADWP is under legal obligation to provide water for various enhancement and mitigation projects, including but not limited to the Owens Lake and Lower Owens River Project.

Monday the Inyo County/Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Technical Group will meet at 8:30 a.m. in the DWP Multi-Purpose Room at 300 Mandich Street, Bishop. The meeting will include a discussion of the 2015-2016 Annual Owens Valley Operations Plan, and a discussion of water distribution for irrigation and other environmental projects in the Owens Valley. The public will be offered the opportunity to comment on each agenda item prior to any action. There will also be a public comment period to open the Monday meeting.

 

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The Owens Valley Committee Meets

Letter from the OVC:
The Owens Valley Committee met Wednesday to discuss short-term solutions for getting water to the valley’s ranchers. The group called this emergency meeting in reaction to Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s letter of April 27, which notified valley ranchers they’d be cut off from all irrigation water starting May 1.
OVC has been aware for quite some time that ranchers are being squeezed by LADWP. In its December 2014 newsletter, OVC wrote,
LADWP has long seen ranch water as a waste. Over the last several years, they have attempted to coerce ranchers and farmer to reduce water use by financial incentives, and have successfully petitioned the County to reduce irrigation duty to 3 acre feet by the use of sprinklers on some parcels. ‘Water conservation’ has become a euphemism for exporting more water to Los Angeles.’ ‘Saving’ ranch water isn’t a good thing in the Owens Valley. When a rancher irrigates with ditches, riparian habitat is formed, not only along the ditch, but through ‘tail water,’ or water at the end of the ditch that extends beyond the official irrigated parcel. [‘Saving’ water] eliminates tail water and destroys riparian and meadow habitat that has been irrigated for decades, as well as killing the tree and shrub hedgerows between fields.
Pressuring ranchers about water use is nothing new for LADWP. Deciding to cut off irrigation water entirely, however, is one of LADWP’s most obvious, glaring violations of the Long Term Water Agreement to date. Though LADWP rescinded this action on April 29, OVC is seriously concerned that LADWP has set an alarming precedent for future moves against Owens Valley agriculture. Ranchers and farmers are important contributors to Owens Valley’s economy, as well as stewards of the land. Agriculture is the second largest economic driver in Inyo County. $19.8 million in economic contribution, or 77% of total agricultural production, is dependent on irrigation. Ranchers’ entire livelihoods are at risk if they do not receive the water promised by the Long Term Water Agreement. Bankruptcy of ranch owners means long term “water savings” for LADWP because there is no guarantee that the DWP will spread water as effectively as Owens Valley ranchers doing their day to day jobs.
Confusing and inconsistent numbers regarding water storage and supply were circulated at the “Talking Water Workshop” on April 28th in the Inyo County Board of Supervisors chambers. The OVC would like to know the exact figures regarding water amounts LADWP has in storage at Crowley, Pleasant Valley, and Tinnemaha Reservoirs. DWP is planning to send about 42,000 acre feet to Los Angeles this year. The reservoirs upstream of the Owens Valley could supply some of that water to ranchers instead.
Some options the Owens Valley Committee discussed Wednesday were:
1. Lowering the minimum flow in the Lower Owens River Project (LORP) from 40 to as low as 30 cubic feet per second (cfs) for the remainder of the run-off year. This water would be reallocated to in-valley use.
2. Reductions in flows to the Owens Lake delta during the irrigation season. This water would be reallocated for in-valley use.

OVC will only consider options that guarantee re-allocated water remains in the Owens Valley.  The Owens Valley has been in an artificial drought since the early 1900s when the City of Los Angeles began exporting water south. This drought intensified in 1972 when LADWP began heavily pumping groundwater and sending it down a second barrel of the aqueduct. Predictably, increased water export spurred increased growth—including water-guzzling lawns, ponds, golf courses, swimming pools, etc.—in the naturally arid Los Angeles basin and surrounding area, and created more of a thirst for Owens Valley water. Like many western cities, Los Angeles has created a problem for itself by actively encouraging a “need” for more and more water.
The Owens Valley Committee appreciates any actions taken to cut back on water usage in Los Angeles—but the City needs to do more. In deciding to issue a letter to Owens Valley ranchers cutting off their access to irrigation water on May 1, LADWP took unilateral and unquestionably illegal action in direct violation of the Long Term Water Agreement and 1991 EIR. This is not a legitimate option. The Owens Valley has been living in an artificial LA-imposed drought for more than a century. The burden of sacrifice during this state-wide drought should not fall on the shoulders of Owens Valley’s ranchers, thereby causing more damage to the valley’s already severely depleted ecosystem. The burden of sacrifice should fall on the shoulders of the City of Los Angeles.

cover photo by Gary Young.

ladwp, inyo county, drought 2015, owens valley committee, eastern sierra news
lorp

Lower Owens River Project Draft Report

LORP 2014 Draft Report Available

This years annual report is now available for review and can be downloaded from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Powers website.  The report can be found at www.ladwp.com/LORP.  The report represents the completion of the eighth year of monitoring and contains the Memorandum of Understanding Consultant’s Adaptive management recommendations.  A hard copy of the report may be reviewed by the public at the LADWP office at 300 Mandich Street, Bishop.  Inyo County and the LADWP will be conducing a public meeting on the draft report at a meeting set for 9am on Wednesday, January 14th at the Inyo County Board of Supervisors Chambers at 224 North Edwards Street, Independence.  The meeting will provide the public the opportunity to offer comments on the draft report and any other LORP-related issues they would like to discuss with staff from the LADWP, Inyo County, and the MOU consultants.

eastern sierra news, lower owens river project, ladwp, inyo county
inyo

Adventure Trails Hearing Re-Scheduled

The Inyo Adventure Trails Public Hearing has been set

The Public Hearing for the Adventure Trails project currently scheduled for December 30, 2014, in Independence has been rescheduled to January 22, 2015, at 10 a.m. in Independence. Due to threats of litigation surrounding the project, the postponement is necessary to provide more time for the state’s Fair Political Practices Commission (FPPC) to provide the County with guidance about the ability of all five members of the Board of Supervisors to participate in the decision making process.
Originally scheduled for December 2nd, the Public Hearing was cancelled and re-scheduled for December 30th when a recent Fair Political Practices  Commission (FPPC) regulation governing conflict of interest determinations for elected officials created uncertainty about the ability of members of the Board of Supervisors to vote on the Adventure Trails project. Out of an abundance of caution, the County cancelled the meeting and rescheduled the Hearing to allow time for the FPPC to provide a legal opinion.
Last Friday, Inyo County Counsel Marge Kemp-Williams was  contacted by an FPPC representative who indicated that FPPC’s due date for providing the County with a ruling is January 12, 2015.
Based on this information, Ms. Kemp-Williams advised that it would be prudent to wait for FPPC guidance. Ms. Kemp-Williams explained that, without a ruling from the FPPC, each member of the Board of Supervisors will need to make an individual decision about their ability to participate in the vote.  If more than two Supervisors declare a conflict and recuse themselves from the decision making
process, in order to ensure a quorum of the Board exists to make the legally required decision, those Supervisors declaring a conflict would have to draw straws to determine which of the disqualified
Supervisors will be selected to create a quorum to participate in the decision despite their declared conflict. The same process will be employed if the FPPC opines that three or more Supervisors cannot vote in the process. As a matter of law, if only three members of the Board of Supervisors – a quorum – are available to vote on a decision, then the decision must be approved by all three
Supervisors.
“If it turns out only three members of the Board of Supervisors are able to vote on the Adventure trails project, it will require a unanimous vote, instead of a majority vote,” said County
Administrator Kevin Carunchio. “There is an overriding need to use every opportunity to ensure that each member of Board of Supervisors has the best possible information on which to determine their ability to participate in the decision making process and maintain the integrity of the Adventure Trails project.”
Carunchio acknowledged that nobody was pleased with the need to cancel the December 2nd meeting, and some people did not agree with the decision to schedule the hearing on December 30th.
He also recognizes that there may be others who may not be happy with the need to reschedule the meeting.

adventure trails, inyo county, kevin carunchio, fppc, marge kemp-williams

The Inyo-Mono Master Gardeners to Host Workshop this Month

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT ON  CACTI & SUCCULENT WORKSHOP FROMINYO-MONO MASTER GARDENERS

Date: For Immediate Release, Nov. 1, 2014

Cacti and Succulent Workshop

The Inyo-Mono Master Gardeners would like to invite the general public to attend a workshop on cacti and succulents on Sunday, November 16, 2014, 2:00 P.M. – 3:00 P.M. It will be held at the U.S. Forest Service Building on West Line Street in Bishop.

SUCCULENTS AND CACTI ARE ALL THE RAGE

Have you thought of using succulents in a bridal bouquet? How about using pumpkins and succulents for a Thanksgiving centerpiece? Is a Christmas cactus a staple in your house?

Cactus and succulents are perfect for the busy gardener as they require less maintenance and water in the garden and in the home. These plants are used in the home landscape, container gardening and indoor terrariums. They can be sculptural in the garden or used for the shape and color of their leaves.

Join the Inyo-Mono Master Gardeners, and learn about cacti and succulents. Sherry Cosgrove of Keeler Beach Farm and the Inyo Mono Master Gardener Program present a workshop on Sunday, November 16, 2014, 2PM-3PM at the US Forest Service Building, W. Line St. Bishop.

Learn about cacti and succulents from around the world. Propagation, soils and care and feeding of these unusual and exotic plants will be highlighted as we see many varieties on display. Attendees receive free cuttings and some plants will be for sale.

Questions to Susan Flaherty, Master Gardener Coordinator, 760 873-3179.

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Bishop / Eastern Sierra / Inyo County / Mono County / Inyo-Mono Master Gardeners / Community / Workshop / Cacti & Succulents

 

Fourth Annual Shop-with-a-Cop, December 13th

DONATIONS SOUGHT FOR SHOP-WITH-A-COP

Members of the Mammoth Lakes Police Department, Mono County Sheriff’s Office, Bishop Police Department, and Inyo County Sheriff’s Office and other criminal justice agencies are busy planning the fourth annual Shop-with-a-Cop, scheduled for Saturday, December 13.  This is a special day where local law enforcement helps families in the Eastern Sierra have a nice Christmas.  Children from disadvantaged families are identified by the various departments.  On Saturday morning, the children are picked up at their homes by the police officer “partner” and taken to breakfast.

After breakfast, they respond code three (red lights and siren) from breakfast to K-Mart in Bishop where they are each provided with $200 to shop for Christmas for their families.  After shopping, volunteers wrap the gifts and the officers and their new partner travel home where an early Christmas celebration begins.

K-Mart has been very generous in providing additional gift cards and all the wrapping materials.

The goal is to provide Christmas for 50 families in the Eastern Sierra.  That means $10,000 must be raised.  Various organizations and individuals have provided funds, more are needed.  Anyone interested in making a donation may drop it off at either the Mammoth Lakes Police Department or Bishop Police Department.  Checks should be made to MLPOA with “Shop-with-a-Cop” written in the “For” line.

And, if anyone is having a difficult time getting into the spirit of the holidays, drop by K-Mart around ten in the morning on December 13 and volunteer to wrap gifts.  It’s guaranteed you’ll leave feeling much better about yourself!

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Inyo County / Mono County / Eastern Sierra / Christmas / Volunteers / Donations / Bishop Police Department / Mammoth Lakes Police Department

South County Search & Rescue Command Center Dedication

Dedication Ceremony, Lone Pine

On Saturday October 18th the South County Search and Rescue (SAR) Command Center, located at the Lone Pine Airport, was officially unveiled and dedicated to soon-to-be-retired Undersheriff, and longtime SAR Commander, Keith Hardcastle.

Dedication Ceremony
Dedication Ceremony

The building once served as a Forest Service helicopter base center. When the Forest Service transferred their operations to the Independence airport, the building was used mainly as storage.  About six months ago the Inyo County Sheriff’s Office acquired the badly damaged building, and with the help from inmate labor and volunteer SAR members transformed the dilapidated building into a functional command center for south-county SAR operations.

Undersheriff Keith Hardcastle began his career in 1985 as an Inyo County Sheriff’s Deputy; he has been a SAR Coordinator since 1994.  “When I began as a Coordinator for SAR it was a different era – there were no cell phones, no on-the-fly mapping technology; map and compass was how we got the job done,” said Hardcastle.

Sheriff Lutze went on to say that, “Undersheriff Hardcastle has been involved in countless SAR missions and his scope and depth of knowledge in local terrain has saved many lives.  His legacy when he retires on December 30th will be leaving behind a highly trained and dedicated SAR team made up of volunteers and Sheriff’s Deputies who are both hardworking and knowledgeable. Undersheriff Hardcastle has been instrumental in training new coordinators and the Search and Rescue team will be in excellent hands with Deputy Nate Derr and Deputy Brian Hohenstein.”

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Eastern Sierra / Inyo County / South County Search & Rescue / Lone Pine Airport / SAR Command Center / Lone Pine / Dedication Ceremony

 

Eastern Sierra Public Health Team Addresses Ebola Situation

EASTERN SIERRA PUBLIC HEALTH

MEDIA BRIEF

Richard O. Johnson, M.D., MPH 

Public Health Officer: Alpine, Inyo, and Mono County

October 16, 2014

Ebola Perspectives and Local Response

We are all saddened, and overwhelmed with all of the information available to us, regarding the Ebola situation. I will attempt to share what we know and don’t know, and close with what we are doing locally. Included will be specific guidance for you as you seek to apply all of this information to your own household. This situation, and guidance is rapidly changing, and we will keep you informed of any significant details that affect you personally.

Africa

A terrible tragedy is unfolding. Although there are officially over 8,000 cases, over 4,000 deaths, and about 300 healthcare workers who have died, the actual numbers are much greater. It is estimated that there may be up to 10,000 new cases per week soon, with estimates of up to 1.4 million cases by January. The much publicized efforts to provide treatment are futile unless there is an accompanying mass effort to prevent new cases from developing. The affected countries are Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. The Democratic Republic of Congo has a separate outbreak, and Nigeria and Senegal have successfully managed to snuff out small outbreaks. So, we are currently talking about only 3 countries.

The Virus

Ebola virus disease outbreaks have occurred in other locations in Africa since the 1970’s, but this is the first time in the West African region. This is also the largest outbreak, and the first to migrate into crowded urban areas. The virus exists in the forests of Africa, carried by non-human primates such as gorillas, chimpanzees, and dukars. Bats are also probably involved. The spread to humans comes from contact with this “bushmeat”, as hunting these animals and eating the meat is an essential source of protein for people living in these areas.

The Illness

Infected humans then spread the disease to each other through direct contact with virtually any bodily fluid. Bodies being prepared for burial through complicated cultural rituals are also extremely contagious for at least a few days. A very important fact is that a person is NOT contagious until they actually begin to show symptoms. The incubation period (time from exposure to becoming ill) is 2-21 days, usually 8-10 days. Initially, persons develop fever, headaches, muscle aches and weakness, and sore throat. After about 5 days, abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea begin. This is followed by a rash, and then overwhelming multi-organ system failure, accompanied by bleeding, and death. Fatality rates are estimated to be about 70%, with the young and old being most seriously affected.

The United States

4 individuals infected with the Ebola virus have been brought to the US for treatment in one of the special bio-containment units set-up after 9/11 specifically to deal with this kind of infection. All have under treatment or have recovered, and no staff or other contacts have become sick.

In addition, a resident of Liberia flew to Dallas after being exposed to the virus. He eventually got sick and died. Of special note is the fact that non of  Mr. Duncan’s family and friends, nor the medics or healthcare workers who took care of him during his first hospital visit, ambulance transport, or ED visit – none of whom were wearing any personal protective equipment (PPE) have become sick. We are past the 21 days of risk for all of them.

Now 2 very dedicated and courageous critical care nurses who cared for him in his final days have also become ill. Although they are highly qualified and trained, the procedures and equipment they used were inadequate to prevent them from being exposed to infectious body fluids.

From this experience we can conclude that individuals are not contagious until they are symptomatic, and that the infection is not easily spread until later in the illness when both the increased presence of body fluids (vomit, diarrhea, sweat, etc.) and invasive procedures (breathing tubes, dialysis) puts medical staff at great risk.

California

There have only been 2 suspect cases with a high enough risk to be tested in the state, and both tests were negative. Social media reported a case of Ebola in “Riverside County, California”; however, the truth is that a suspect patient was being tested at the “Riverside Regional Medical Center,” which is actually in Newport News, Virginia. The test results were negative.

The Eastern Sierra

We have been in almost constant communication with federal, state, and regional partners for the last few weeks. Our priorities are to:

–       Ensure the safety of our first responder and healthcare worker community

–       Ensure the safety of our community in the Eastern Sierra

–       Provide high quality compassionate patient care if we have a suspect or proven case

The likelihood of a person presenting to our 911 system, clinics, or hospitals is very small; however, the Dallas experience shows that it can happen anywhere, and we need to be prepared to respond. We have been, and will continue to meet with all of our responder and healthcare community. We are providing training, guidance, and developing protocols for handling any situation that may arise. We have procedures in place for obtaining Ebola testing on a suspect patient. The expectation is that a suspect patient would need to stay in an Emergency Department for 1-3 days until a test result came back, and if positive, arrangements would be made to transfer the individual to a referral facility willing to accept a transfer.

 What actions should you be taking?

  1. Stay informed, but turn off the TV at some point!
  2. Stay connected with family, friends, and neighbors.
  3. I do not see any reason, or anticipate any reason, to change any upcoming travel plans you may have for the holidays or otherwise, unless you are going to West Africa!
  4. If you need medical care for any reason, e.g., have or need an appointment at a clinic, are scheduled to have surgery, need to go or be brought to the Emergency Department, there is no reason to consider changing your plans because of Ebola concerns. Given the current situation, your risk of exposure under those circumstances is ZERO!
  5. Create or update your personal preparedness kit – after all, we live in earthquake and wildfire country!
  6. Get your flu shot – we know the flu is coming to the Eastern Sierra. We do not believe Ebola will be coming, but we have a plan if it does!
  7. Wash your hands – frequently.
  8. Take a deep breathe, enjoy the fall color, get ready for winter, and stay well!

 

For more information, go to: www.cdc.gov/ebola

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Ebola / Eastern Sierra / Bishop / Inyo County / Mono County / Alpine County / Local Response / Eastern Sierra Public Health

Three Inyo County Men Face Drug-Related Charges, Held on Bail

Inyo Narcotics Enforcement Team Makes Arrest in Bishop

For Immediate Release

On Monday, October 6th at approximately noon Agents with the Inyo Narcotics Enforcement Team (INET) contacted Felis Luis Landa Jr. (age 26) of Bishop, Kevin Douglas Elliott (age 24) of Big Pine, and Alberto Verdugo Flores (age 30) of San Diego in the parking lot of the Bishop McDonald’s due to possible criminal activity.

During the contact, Alberto Flores took off running and ignored the Agent’s commands to “stop”.  Flores ran through traffic across Main Street as INET Agents and Officers from the Bishop Police Department pursued on foot.  As Flores was running, Officers noticed he had a plastic bag(s) in his hand.

Landa,Flores,Elliott arrest

Flores was apprehended by Bishop Police Officers in front of a residence on Hammond Street.  Agents and Officers then searched the area where Flores was taken into custody and found three plastic bags containing methamphetamine inside a trash can.  Agents estimated the total amount of methamphetamine to be about two ounces.

Flores, Landa, and Elliott were arrested and charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance, Transportation of a Controlled Substance, Possession of a Controlled Substance for Sale, and Conspiracy.  Flores was additionally charged for Resisting and Delaying an Officer.  All three were transported to the Inyo County Jail; bail has been set at $25,000 each.

-End-

Flores, Alberto
Flores, Alberto
Elliott, Kevin
Elliott, Kevin
Landa, Felis
Landa, Felis

Inyo Narcotics Enforcement Team Makes Arrest in Bishop

http://www.kibskbov.com/drugarrestbishop/

Inyo Narcotics Enforcement Team / Bishop / Eastern Sierra / Inyo County / Arrest / Inyo County Jail

Inyo County Accepting Grants for Community Projects

INYO COUNTY ACCEPTING COMMUNITY PROJECT SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM GRANTS

Inyo County is accepting grant applications from non-profit groups and organizations in the county seeking funding for programs, projects or events taking place from the time the grants are awarded later this year to June 30, 2015.

There is $95,000 worth of grant funding available in this cycle of Inyo County Community Project Sponsorship Program grants. The Inyo County Board of Supervisors approved the $95,000 in CPSP grant funding when it recently approved the fiscal year 2014-15 county budget.

Crowd at the Blake Jones Trout Derby, an event that has received Grant Funding
Crowd at the Blake Jones Trout Derby, an event that has received Grant Funding

Over the past seven years, Inyo County CPSP grants have provided funds to county based non-profits to help sponsor events ranging from marathons to fishing derbies, contributed to projects as diverse as web page redesign and printing of promotional brochures, and paid for advertising that promotes local and regional events and programs.

The CPSP program is focused on helping local organizations promote activities and programs that bring visitors to the area, and also supports events and programs that enhance the cultural and recreational quality of life of the county’s residents.

The Program Guidelines and Grant Application forms are available online at the Inyo County website, under Community Project Sponsorship Program, at www.inyocounty.us/Comm_Proj_Spon/CPSP.htm.

The deadline for applying for the Community Project Sponsorship Fall Grant Cycle is Friday, Oct. 17, 2014.

To be considered, three copies of the completed grant application, each with an original signature, must be received by the Office of the County Administrator by 5 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 17, 2014.

No postmarks or facsimile copies will be accepted. Digital grant applications, which still need original signatures, may be sent to jklusmire@inyocounty.us or lpiper@inyocounty.us.

Organizations or groups with questions about the grant guidelines, the application process or the program in general can call Jon Klusmire at 760-878-0258 for more information.

Grant applications being mailed should be sent to: Office of the County Administrator, Attn: Community Project Sponsorship Program, P.O. Drawer N, Independence, CA 93526. If hand delivering, deliver to: Office of the County Administrator, 224 N. Edwards Street, Independence, CA, (760) 878-0292.

Grant applications deemed complete and eligible will be forwarded to a Review Panel for evaluation, ranking and suggested funding levels. The Board of Supervisors is expected to consider the Review Panel’s funding recommendations and make a final decision on the specific grant awards toward the beginning of November.

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INYO COUNTY ACCEPTING COMMUNITY PROJECT SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM GRANTS

http://www.kibskbov.com/inyocountygrants/

Inyo County / Owens Valley / Eastern Sierra / Community Project Sponsorship Program Grants / Grant Funding / Tourism / History / Culture / Recreation / Local / Programs / Events / Non-Profit Organizations