Tag Archives: Inyo County

Round Valley Student Alexandra Morales Wins Inyo County Speech Contest

Inyo County Office of Education is pleased to announce that Alexandra Morales from Round Valley Joint Elementary School won first place at the 59 th annual Inyo County Speech Contest, for her speech: Parkland, Columbine, Sandy Hook, Enough! The second place winner was Paige Makris from Owens Valley Elementary School with her speech: Turning Obstacles into Opportunities. The third place winner was Kyle Schaniel from Seventh Day Adventist with the topic: Nuclear Fission. Also representing their schools were: Willam Young, Will Hennarty, Luis Leon, Marlene Castro, Jade Scott, and Harlee Bardonnex.

The Speech Contest was sponsored by Bishop Real Estate and held on April 11 th at the Jill Kinmont Boothe School. Students from Big Pine, Home Street Middle School, Owens Valley, Round Valley, and Seventh Day Adventist participated in the event. The topic was: How could lessons learned from historical examples of tragedy and triumph be applied to decisions we make every day? Audience members were impressed by the insightful and inspiring speeches from creative middle-schoolers striving to make our world a better place.

All speeches were evaluated on content and delivery by a panel of three community judges: Gerald Howard, Maggie Kingsbury, and Chris Langley. Inyo County Office of Education thanks these judges for their time and expertise.

In addition, ICOE would like to thank Bishop Real Estate Rasmuson & Associates for sponsoring the contest and providing the winners with trophies and cash prizes.

ICOE would also like to express gratitude to the school coaches for their time, effort and support for our students. The coaches were Tim Steele of Big Pine School, Mark DesRochers of Home Street Middle School, Vivian Hanson of Owens Valley School, Jennifer Morales of Round Valley School, and Sandy Burns for Seventh Day Adventist School.

Congratulations to all the participants!

Death Valley National Park Gains Land and More

DEATH VALLEY, CA – The largest national park outside of Alaska just got bigger.  On March 12, President Trump signed public lands legislation that included several changes to Death Valley National Park.

The John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act (Public Law 116-9) transferred approximately 35,000 acres of land from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to the National Park Service. Already nearly the size of Connecticut, Death Valley National Park increased by about 1% to 3,422,024 acres.

One part of the transfer is a 6,369-acre lollipop-shaped section of land adjacent to the Big Pine – Death Valley Road in the northern part of the park. It includes the Crater Mine, a colorful former sulfur mine.

The 28,923-acre “Bowling Alley” is a long, narrow swath of land on the northern border of Fort Irwin National Training Center. This area includes a portion of the Quail Mountains.

About 93% of the park is designated as the Death Valley National Park Wilderness, which is the sixth-largest wilderness area in the nation and the largest outside of Alaska. The Dingell Act added 87,999 acres of wilderness in North Eureka Valley, Panamint Valley, Warm Springs, Ibex, Bowling Alley, and Axe Head.

The Act designated 5.3 miles of Surprise Canyon Creek as a Wild River. The wild river designation provides further protection to this rare desert creek and adjacent Panamint City, a 1870s silver mining ghost town.

The Dingell Act authorizes the operation and maintenance of the existing microwave telecommunications infrastructure on Mormon Peak. AT&T owns this facility, which has been in legal limbo since the land it sits on was designated as wilderness in 1994. With the exception of satellite connections, the Mormon Peak facility relays all land-line telephone, cell phone, and internet connections for Death Valley residents and visitors.

www.nps.gov/deva-

Search for Missing US Marine in Sierra Nevada Moves to Limited Continuous Mode

CENTRAL SIERRA NEVADA, Calif. March 16, 2019 – A massive multiagency search in the Sierra Nevada has been underway for more than a week to locate missing U.S. Marine Corps 1st Lt. Matthew Kraft, a 24-year-old man from Washington, Conn. Kraft set out on a solo ski and hike trip on Feb. 24 with an itinerary to complete the 195-mile Sierra High Route on March 4 or 5. Beginning today the search operation will transition into a limited continuous search status until Kraft is found.
On March 4, Kraft’s father contacted Mono County Sheriff after not hearing from his son. Mono County Sheriff’s Office began checking trail heads in the Bridgeport area that day. Cell phone forensics initiated by Mono County Sheriff showed that his last phone activity was in the Independence area, in Inyo County. Inyo County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue began a search on March 5. The evening of March 8, Kraft’s vehicle was located at the Grays Meadows campground above Independence, Calif.
Backcountry snow instability and weather issues, including high winds, have been a significant challenge for search crews. Both aerial and ground searches have identified avalanche activity, cornices, and snow bridges throughout the wilderness, including along the Sierra High Route. The search zone has been determined to be larger than the state of Rhode Island and consists of the 195-mile Sierra High Route as well as multiple points of potential exit.
Aerial reconnaissance and ground teams have been deployed to the search area; however to date there have been no substantiated clues that link Kraft to any particular search area.
Additionally, aircraft with thermal and night vision imagery capabilities have been flying the route and while several points of interest have been identified – all have been investigated and determined to be animal related. Search crews also employed RECCO technology, an electronic device to find people buried in an avalanche.
Search and rescue authorities have been unable to locate evidence of Kraft’s location along his planned route.
The Marine Corps, along with the other assisting agencies, will continue to stand by and support Kraft’s family, friends, and Marines during this difficult time.
Agencies assisting throughout this search include U.S. Marine Corps, Mono County Sheriff, Mono County Search and Rescue, Inyo County Sheriff, Inyo County Search and Rescue, Madera County Sheriff, Fresno County Sheriff, Tulare County Sheriff, Los Angeles County Sheriff, Sequoia and Kings National Parks, Yosemite National Park, CHP H-80, CHP H-40, Air National Guard, Sierra Madre Search and Rescue Team, Bay Area Mountain Rescue Unit, China Lake Naval Weapons Base, and California Office of Emergency Services.
This is the final news release about this search and rescue operation, unless new information becomes available.
Beginning Monday, March 18, InciWeb, the Incident Information System being used to relay regular updates will go into inactive status, meaning updates will no longer be posted, but the page will remain accessible to anyone wanting information about this search.
For more information about this search please visit: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6272/
If you were in the search area on or around Feb. 23, and you think you might have seen Kraft, please call 559-565-4286.

Jack Johantgen Obituary

Jack Johantgen was born in Tulsa Oklahoma in 1932. He was the youngest of three sons born to Clara and John Robins Johantgen. Joseph and Robert his older siblings both served in the military and after Jack finished high school he moved with his parents to Prescott Arizona and followed his brother’s example by enlisting in the Navy. Jack served in the navy for three years on an aircraft carrier and went on to receive his degree in engineering from San Diego University.

Jack was married to his first wife Helen Lujan in 1955. They lived in Pasadena as well as San Diego while Jack was in the Navy and eventually settled in Ridgecrest California where Jack began a 30-plus year career at China Lake Weapons Center. Together they raised 7 children: Knud, Helen, Marie, Bess, John, Jeannie and Francis. They were blessed with 12 grandchildren Casey, Allison, Daniel, Richie, Stephen, Alexis, Angela, Remington, Marjorie, Amanda, Regan and Ali.

Jack was an electrical engineer and was recognized for his significant contributions to the Sidewinder short-range air-to-air and antiradiation missiles and radar warning receivers over his years of employment at China Lake. Johantgen, a supervisory electronics engineer who headed the Missile Guidance Branch in the Electronic Warfare Department’s RF Development Division was also is the program manager of the Antiradiation Projectile Program (ARP) for more than two decades at NWC. His notable contributions as a design engineer, system engineer, program manager and line manager were considered the forefront of technology, pushing forward the state-of-the-art and contributed to the outstanding recognition for the Naval Weapons Center as a leader in tactical weapons development.

Jack divorced and remarried his second wife Jeannie Smith in 2001. Through this marriage he was given a gift of 3 more children Shawn, Todd and Tracy; 10 grandchildren: Gavin, Chad, Lauren, Elias, Nicole, Amanda, Caleb, Cassandra, Katie, and Alex; 4 great-grandchildren Skylar, Grayson, Elyse, and Reegan.

Jack lived in Ridgecrest for over 30 years, he also lived in Mammoth Lakes and retired in Bishop with his wife Jeannie. Both were avid skiers and bicyclists. Jack traveled cross county on his bike at age 72. They enjoyed traveling throughout Europe, Mexico and Hawaii, many of their trips included bike tours and sailing. They loved opening their homes in the Sierras to family and friends and hosted many family holidays and celebrations.

Jack was long-term parishioner of Ridgecrest’s St. Ann Catholic Church, St Joseph in Mammoth and Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Bishop California and he served as a Catholic youth educator in both Mammoth and Bishop.

Jack Johantgen died peacefully in his home in Bishop California on Sunday March 10 surrounded by family. He was preceded in death by his brother Joseph Johantgen, his parents Clara Agnes and John Robins Johantgen; son Knud Neilson and daughter Marie Anne Johantgen.

Services:
Rosary is scheduled Friday March 15th at 3 PM at Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Bishop California,
849 Home St. Bishop
Mass will be held Saturday March 16th at 11 AM at Our Lady of Perpetual Help
Reception immediately following the service at the home of Jack and Jeannie Johantgen at 3561 Majestic Way, Bishop
Graveside Service Monday March 18th at 1:30 in Ridgecrest at the Desert Memorial Park 801 S. San Bernardino County Line Rd.

Samantha Burns set to Compete in Poetry Out Loud State Finals in Sacramento

The Poetry Out Loud State Championships start this weekend on Sunday, and Inyo County’s local champion is competing in Sacramento. Samantha Burns, a student at Bishop Union High School will be competing against students from fifty-two other counties in California.

If Samantha were to place in the top eight of the Poetry Out Loud contest, she would have the opportunity to attend the national contest in Washington DC.

As far as the competition is concerned, there are two heats occurring at the Stanley Mosk Library in Sacramento on Sunday. The northern counties for California will start the proceedings at 9:00 AM. Afterwards, students from the southern counties will read their poetry beginning at 2:00 P.M. Inyo County is apart of the southern groupings.

There are two poems which students must recite. The contestants are judged by accuracy, eye contact and delivery. Several judges determine who they believe were the best performers and the finalists will have to recite their third poems in the State Capitol Senate Chamber on Monday. Afterward, a winner will be selected by the judges.

Inyo County’s finalist, Samantha Burns two poems she will recite are Bleeding Heart and Blade Unplugged. Bleeding Heart is a poem written by Carmen Giménez Smith, a poet based in New York City, who has been awarded the Juniper Prize for Poetry. The second poem is Blade Unplugged, written by Tim Seibles, who is a poet and a professor of English and creative writing at Old Dominion University.

“I am so proud of Samantha qualifying for this event.” Samatha’s mother Sandy said. “She worked extremely hard for this opportunity, and being apart of this event just goes to show how much love and appreciation she has for poetry.”

Bishop Broncos Volleyball Banquet Recap

The BUHS Volleyball team wrapped up their 2018 Season with a celebratory banquet.

Many Broncos were recognized for their successes as stellar student-athletes throughout a great 2018 season.

-20 of the 24 players were recognized as Scholar Athletes, maintaining a 3.5 or higher GPA throughout the entire season!

-BUHS AWARD RECIPIENTS were as follows: (listed JV/Varsity):

The Bronco Award:  Averly Haye/Sydney Frigerio

The Golden Horseshoe Award:  Dakota Reynolds/Danica Thornburg

Coaches Award:  Clara Place/ Sophia Gutierrez and Sadie Dishion

Offensive MVP:  Lillian Russell/Sydney Frigerio

Defensive MVP:  Maddy Morrison/Cassidy Mann

-HIGH DESERT LEAGUE (HDL) ALL LEAGUE HONORS:

Honorable Mention:  Hana Hogan

Second Team:  Haven del Giudice

Second Team:  Cassidy Mann

First Team:  Danica Thornburg

All League All Academic:  Sydney Frigerio

All League MVP:  Sydney Frigerio

The Bronco Volleyball program has had three All League MVPs in the last 7 years,  and is proud to have yet another one join this exceptional group! Thank you for everyone’s support!

 

Clint Quilter Appointed Inyo County Administrator

By unanimous vote during closed session at its regular meeting Tuesday, November 6, 2018, the Inyo County Board of Supervisors appointed Clint G. Quilter to serve as the next Inyo County Administrative Officer. A contract outlining the terms of Quilter’s employment as CAO will be developed and brought to the Board of Supervisors for consideration at its November 13 meeting.

Quilter has been serving as Acting CAO since August 11, 2018.

His appointment is effective immediately and follows an exhaustive nationwide search began in July by a professional recruiting firm under contract with the County. The firm recently narrowed the field of applicants to six finalists from across the country. Separating Quilter from the pack were his mix of practical and executive leadership skills, knowledge of and experience with local issues, and a leadership style that emphasizes employee engagement and encourages communication.

“Before selecting the next CAO, the Board of Supervisors devoted resources to an extensive, thorough recruitment process and we took our time to ensure we had the best candidate, and the right fit, for Inyo County,” Board Chairperson Dan Totheroh said. “The recruiting firm presented us with several top-tier candidates to choose from and we believe we have selected the best person for this critical position.

“The Board of Supervisors looks forward to continuing its work with Mr. Quilter as Inyo County CAO, and is confident he will continue to bring innovative and constructive ideas and projects to the table, as well as provide for proactive, strong leadership for the benefit of County departments and employees and the public they serve.”

Quilter comes to the position with 29 years of local-government experience, including 21 years of executive level leadership.

Prior to his appointment as Acting CAO, Quilter served as Public Works Director for the past five years, leading a 58-person department with an $18 million budget and administering and coordinating the Airports, Engineering, Town Water Systems, Facility and Grounds Maintenance, Building & Safety, and Roads divisions. As Public Works Director, he also assumed ultimate responsibility for all County project management, and was a member of the Cannabis Working Group that helped to develop Inyo County’s commercial cannabis regulations.

Quilter relocated to Inyo County in 2013 from the City of Hollister, where he served nearly nine years as City Manager for the community of 38,000 people. Prior to that, he served as Hollister’s Public Works Director.

A native of Tonopah, Nev., Quilter is married and has three stepchildren with wife Sheyanne.

As CAO, Quilter will continue the duties he began as Acting CAO, including overseeing the administrative activities of the 424-employee organization; administering a $100 million budget as Budget Officer; providing professional and technical support to the five-member elected Board of Supervisors and administering and implementation of its policies and objectives; serving as Personnel Director; and advancing such initiatives as the new Consolidated Office Building and development of commercial air service at the Bishop Airport.

“I very much appreciate the Board of Supervisors’ confidence in me and am excited to continue serving the citizens of Inyo County in this new capacity,” Quilter said.

ECS seal - silver outlinesmall

Polling Locations for Mono, Inyo, and Nye Counties

INYO COUNTY

November 6, 2018 Election Day Voting Locations

Precincts

Voting location

Address

City

101,102,
103,105,
106,107,
108,109, 111

Fairgrounds —

Heritage Arts Building

1135 N. Main St

Bishop

110

Paiute Professional Building

50 Tu Su Lane

Bishop

113, 114

Big Pine Town Hall

150 Dewey St

Big Pine

116

Basement Courtroom

(Court House)

168 N Edwards St

Independence 

All Precincts

Central Count Location

168 N Edwards St

Independence 

118, 119

Statham Town Hall

138 Jackson St

Lone Pine

NYE COUNTY

Amargosa Community Center
Amargosa Precinct 6
829 Amargosa Farm Road
Amargosa Valley, Nevada 89020

Beatty Community Center
Beatty Precinct 1
100 A. Avenue South
Beatty, Nevada 89003

Bob Ruud Community Center
All Pahrump Precincts
150 North Highway 160
Pahrump, NV 89060

Donald L. Simpson Community Center
Round Mountain Precinct 12, Smoky Valley Precinct 35
650 Civic Drive
Round Mountain, NV 89045

Tonopah Convention Center
Tonopah Precincts 14, 15
301 W. Brougher
Tonopah, NV 89049

Wellness Center and Progress House Food Drive Starts Tomorrow

Don’t forget! Tomorrow, the Wellness Center and Progress house are going to be having a food collection event for The Salvation Army’s food pantry.

Make sure your food bags are placed on your porch or doorstep. The event will take place in neighborhoods between South Barlow to West Bishop/Manor Area the morning of Friday, Nov 2nd and collected the morning of November 5th.

Make sure to put you bags next to your mailbox, to make it easier on those picking up the food.

If you have questions, contact the Wellness Center at 760-873-8039

INYO RUN OFF

Inyo County Agencies unite to battle massive run off projected from record snowpack.

Posted by Seth Conners

According to Amanda Parsons at LADWP, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is working proactively to prepare for the arrival of anticipated massive runoff water resulting from this year’s near record snowpack in the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. These efforts are in partnership with Inyo County, the Inyo Sheriff’s Department, Bishop Police Department, Cal-Trans, Southern California Edison and others, as a member of the Inyo County Interagency Emergency Preparation team.

Work to prepare for the anticipated high water flows began in late February. The efforts have been assisted by an Emergency Declaration from the Mayor of the City of Los Angeles to allow LADWP to take immediate steps to protect infrastructure and aid in managing flood waters while also protecting public safety. Inyo County issued a similar declaration.

To maximize the beneficial use of runoff water to the fullest extent, LADWP is spreading water throughout the aqueduct system to replenish local groundwater aquifers. Current spreading is moderate and will increase as runoff occurs in larger quantities later this spring and summer. LADWP is also maximizing flows in the LA Aqueduct by lowering reservoirs to create more storage space for runoff water and supplying the City of Los Angeles with aqueduct water in place of purchased water and groundwater wherever possible to manage excess flows. Further, LADWP crews are hard at work preparing, cleaning, and repairing water conveyance ditches, spreading basins, sand traps, and other facilities located on City of Los Angeles property, areas controlled by LADWP, and along the Los Angeles Aqueduct, in order to manage the anticipated runoff. 

Water that exceeds what can be spread to recharge local aquifers and which does not make it into the LA Aqueduct system will end up on the Owens Lakebed, the natural terminus point for waters flowing down the Owens River. Once there, it will add to the existing 30 sq. miles of saline brine pools and is expected to cause significant flood damage to dust control infrastructure managed and constructed by LADWP over the past 17 years. These measures, spread over nearly 50 sq. miles of dried lake, have effectively reduced dust pollution in the area by 96 percent. Damage to these dust control areas may result in increased air pollution that could threaten the health of the public after the runoff evaporates in 12 to 18 months.

LADWP is also concerned by the potential of water overflow in and around the towns and communities of the Eastern Sierra and is actively providing assistance in preventing and controlling runoff that could impact the public. Emergency assistance will be provided on lands throughout the valley should flooding threaten the property of a partner agency or the public.

“Inyo County is no stranger to emergencies and disasters,” Inyo County Sheriff Bill Lutze said. “Our resilience comes from a strong unified command made up of local, state and federal agencies as well as a public that is proactive in emergency preparedness. We continue to be grateful for our strong working relationships with our allied agencies, including Department of Water and Power, as well as with our residents.”

In order to keep the public informed of the steps being taken to manage runoff to the greatest extent possible and minimize the impact to dust control measures, LADWP will issue regular updates of its runoff management efforts.

Emergency Runoff Management Activities undertaken by LADWP as of April 11, 2017, include:

 

Water Spreading

Pleasant Valley to Tinemaha Reservoir –      23,500 acre feet (AF)

Tinemaha Reservoir to Haiwee Reservoir – 7,600 AF

South of Haiwee Reservoir –                         5,200 AF

 

Total Spreading Water                                    36,300 AF

 

Maintenance and Construction Activities

Mono County

 

·         Crowley Lake will be lowered to 80,000 AF to make room for anticipated runoff. Current level – 107,000 AF

·         Completed Long Valley Dam and spillway inspections (Work will be ongoing)

·         Snow removal to better access Long Valley Reservoir Dam (Complete)

Currently very little work is being conducted in the Mono Basin due to heavy snow. Equipment is planned to be staged at critical structures and areas likely to see high water conditions, such as Lee Vining Intake and Rock Creek sand trap at Toms Place. This will take place once site conditions allow.

 

Pleasant Valley Reservoir to Tinemaha Reservoir

·         Applied for variance from Department of Water Resources Division of Safety of Dams to raise Pleasant Valley Reservoir water level (Complete)

Work to repair and upgrade existing spreading ponds and diversion structures in the Laws/Five bridges area include:

·         Reinforce and increase size of pond berms to increase spreading capacity and durability. Installing additional head walls and diversion pipes and culverts to provide greater flexibility during spreading operations (90% complete)

·         Preparing to raise portions of patrol roads adjacent to the canals to provide additional free board and greater conveyance capacity in both the Upper and Lower McNally Canals. This work will provide the ability to spread over 100 cubic feet per second (cfs) into the nearby spreading ponds or to spreading areas located further downstream (Project starting this week)

·         Preparing portions of the McNally Canals East of Hwy 6 to accept water by mowing and cleaning (Complete)

Work on canals, ditches and ponds in the Bishop area include:

·         Cleaning the George Collins and the A.O. Collins Canals and repairing/replacing diversion and spreading structures (Complete)

·         Cleaning, mowing and repairing diversion structures on the Rawson Canal (Complete)

·         Cleaning, mowing and repairing diversion structures on the Ford Rawson Canal (Complete)

·         Cleaning and mowing Bishop Creek Canal (Complete)

·         Modifying irrigation ditches off Bishop Creek to maximize spreading potential (Complete – Additional work will be needed over the summer months to remove aquatic vegetation to maintain capacity in the canal)

·         Filling Farmers Ponds, located on the West side of Hwy 6, and installing new culvert and diversion structures to convey water to the ponds located on the East side of the highway (Complete)

Round Valley area work includes:

·         Hand crews cleaning all open diversions on Horton Creek and Lower Rock Creek (Complete –  Work will be ongoing in the area with both equipment and hand crews cleaning ditches, installing culverts and diversion structures to maximize spreading potential.)

Big Pine area sand trap and diversion structure work includes:

·         Cleaning the Baker Creek sand traps, diversion structures and ponds (50% complete)

·         Cleaning and mowing the Big Pine Canal (Complete – Further work will be needed throughout the summer to maintain capacity once aquatic growth begins to restrict flows.)

·         Tinemaha Creek and Red Mountain Creek diversions cleaned and marked. (75% complete – Further work will be needed to direct flows into existing catch basins and spreading ponds located in the adjacent areas.)

Tinemaha Reservoir to Haiwee Reservoir

·         Repairing/rebuilding spreading basin infrastructure (70% complete – Able to spread in excess of 200 cubic feet per second at this time)

Work in the Black Rock Ditch area includes:

  • Rebuild/repair/replace culverts, check structures and distribution pipes (Complete)
  • Clean and/or repair distribution channels (70% complete)

Work in the Stevens Ditch area includes:

·         Mowing, cleaning and adding spreading culverts (Complete – Currently at 50% of capacity)

·         Prepare Thibaut area ditches and berms (Complete)

Work to prepare the two canals located east of the Owens River to divert imminent flow into the LORP includes:

·         Clearing McIver Ditch from East of Goose Lake to south of Mazourka Road (100% complete. Currently flowing 15 cfs during Owens River pulse flow. Evaluating additional work for maximum flows and spreading.)

·         Clearing the Eclipse/East Side Ditch from Mazourka Road to south of Owenyo area (100% complete – Currently flowing 13 cfs during Owens River pulse flow. Evaluating additional work for maximum flows and spreading.)

Los Angeles Aqueduct (LAA) work includes:

  • Cleaning the Unlined section of the LAA (75% complete – Cleaning will be needed throughout runoff season)
  • Cleaning the Lined section of the LAA to the Alabama Gates (100% complete – Cleaning will be ongoing as needed)

Equipment Staging

  • All requested heavy equipment has been rented and received based on forecast needs. Equipment is performing preparation tasks, will be staged during spreading and cleaning operations.

Work to prepare the Lower Owens River Project (LORP) intake includes:

  • Cleaning the Forebay (Complete – Will need to be cleaned throughout the year.)
  • Cleaning the measuring section (Complete)
  • Jetting the Langeman Gate area (Complete)
  • Cleaning the LORP tail bay and 100 Yards downstream (Complete)

Continually preparing the alluvial fan creek diversions west of the LORP:

  • DWP lands:                                          95% complete
  • Bureau of Land Management areas:  70% complete
  • Forest Service areas.                                     100% complete

Owens Lake

 

·         Armoring of berms, northwest area Owens Lake (Work not yet commenced, in purchasing for contract award)

·         Construction of new trenches northwest area of Owens Lake (5% complete)

 

 Lower Owens River Pump-back Station (Pump-back Station) work includes:

·         Placement of temporary barriers, gravels, sandbags and related components around the Pump-back Station to protect it from inundation (Waiting to receive approval from the respective agencies)

·         Widen the path of water within the Lower Owens River across from the Pump-back Station through creating a temporary channel allowing for greater conveyance of water. This temporary measure is intended to prevent ponding of the water in the vicinity of the Pump-back Station and decreasing the potential for water elevation rising in the vicinity of the Pump-back Station (Waiting to receive approval from the respective agencies)

Lower Owens River Temporary Flow Modification work includes:

·         Placement of temporary barriers and related components to redirect the water away from the Corridor 1 Road and the T36 DCA northern berm. This temporary measure is intended to prevent inundation and damage to the existing managed vegetation area in the T36 DCA (Waiting to receive approval from the respective agencies)

·         Modify the east bank of the Owens Lake Delta and tamp down the existing vegetation (tulles) along east side of the Owens Lake Delta to improve water conveyance capability and create a preferred pathway (Waiting to receive approval from the respective agencies)

Western High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) Pipeline work includes:

·         Temporarily securing in place about 825 feet of the irrigation supply lines from T36 dust control area (DCA) to T37 DCA. This measure is intended to prevent the existing three, 18-inch-diamater plastic pipelines from potential floatation and damage (Waiting to receive approval from the respective agencies)   

Zonal Mainline work includes:

·         Placement of temporary plastic lining and related components to protect the Zonal Mainline from damage due to inundation and erosion of the slope of westerly berm road, the Brady Highway, from wave action due to high winds (Waiting to receive approval from the respective agencies)

South of Haiwee Reservoir

·         As of 4/2/17, LADWP has discharged a total of 4,600 from the Los Angeles Aqueduct at three locations: Rose Valley south of Haiwee Reservoir, Freeman Wash west of Ridgecrest, and Cameron Wash north of Mojave.   

·         Working on reestablishing the Maclay Highline, which diverts LAA water to the Pacoima Spreading Grounds (20% complete)

·         Structuring the Power Plant One Slide Gate to place water into San Francisco Creek (Currently pursuing permits for this).

 

To request runoff preparation assistance, please contact Greg Loveland by emailing gregory.loveland@ladwp.com or calling 760–872-1104.