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Regarding Mono Lake

“Regarding Mono Lake” Author at Eastern California Museum

ECM Hosts Local Author Elizabeth Kenneday, “Regarding Mono Lake”

Local author Elizabeth Kenneday will make a presentation and sign copies of her book, “Regarding Mono Lake: Novelty and Delight at an Inland Sea,” at the Eastern California Museum on Saturday Sept. 27 from 1 to 3 p.m. The book examines the human history of the lake, from Piute basket weavers to Basque sheepherders to environmentalists, and explores the cultural and artistic history of the famed lake. The book also and features 56 of Kenneday’s stunning panoramic photos, most of which highlight lesser-known features of Mono Lake. The museum is located at 155 N. Grant St. in Independence, call 760-878-0258 for more information. 

ECM Hosts Local Author Elizabeth Kenneday, “Regarding Mono Lake”

http://www.kibskbov.com/event/regarding-mono-lake-author-at-eastern-cal-museum/

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Author of “Regarding Mono Lake” at Eastern California Museum

ECM Hosts Local Author Elizabeth Kenneday, “Regarding Mono Lake”

Mono Lake is more than photogenic tufa towers.

Regarding Mono Lake
“Regarding Mono Lake”

Although the famed tufa towers are, in most people’s minds, the lake’s trademark, a closer look reveals a landscape dotted with equally intriguing sights and views that draw attention to the region’s rich history and the people who played an integral role in shaping that history.

From Paiute basket makers to loggers and ranchers to environmentalists, the Mono Lake region has attracted an interesting cast of characters. And many of those characters left an indelible artistic mark on the region. Prehistoric Paiute rock art, drawings cut into trees by Basque sheepherders and even a rather creepy Clint Eastwood movie have all made a contribution to the cultural and artistic legacy of the lake.

Local author Elizabeth Kenneday’s new book, “Regarding Mono Lake: Novelty and Delight at an Inland Sea,” documents and explains that human and artistic history, while also showcasing the colorful, unique landscapes that have made Mono Lake an unforgettable natural attraction. Illustrating the book are 56 of Kenneday’s stunning panoramic photos, most of which highlight lesser-known features of the lake.

Kenneday’s photos are both informative and striking. The photos frame ancient tree stumps and abandoned ranches and buildings in a modern context. An abandoned Lime Kiln, a useless boat dock and marina, abandoned mine sites, and the famed Mono Mills lumber site, document the lasting footprint of man’s industrial efforts on the lake. The same is true of the photos of the decrepit “Spa Cottages” on Paoha Island, an empty water tank and a decayed wooden boat.

The lake’s artistic history ranges from Pauite petroglyphs to the eclectic “found art” of the Bottle Place to the making of Clint Eastwood’s “High Plains Drifter,” with is surreal Lago town site on the banks of the lake.

Of course, the famed tufa and picture-postcard sunsets and sunrises also are captured by Kenneday’s camera.

Kenneday will make a presentation and sign copies of her book, “Regarding Mono Lake: Novelty and Delight at an Inland Sea,” at the Eastern California Museum on Saturday Sept. 27 from 1 to 3 p.m. The museum is located at 155 N. Grant St. in Independence, call 760-878-0258 for more information.

Kenneday is well-suited to the task of explaining and exploring Mono Lake’s cultural story.

She was one of  idealistic activists who worked for the Mono Lake Committee while it battled the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power over the utility’s stream diversions that, by the 1980s, had resulted in an alarming drop in the level of the lake. That monumental environmental struggle succeeded in saving the lake. In 2004, she moved back to the Eastern Sierra and began “photographing Mono Lake again in earnest.” Kenneday currently splits her time between Reno and June Lake. She holds a Master of Fine Arts in Painting and Photography and a Ph.D. in Art Educational Theory. She is the emerita professor of Art at California University in Long Beach, and has been awarded a Traditional Fulbright Scholar Fellowship

“This eerie, yet exquisitely beautiful lake has inspired writers, movie producers, artists and photographers, and musicians … the lake and its basin have been the site of Native American activity, a gold rush, agricultural and ranching endeavors, an oil boom, other commercial activities, and tourism,” she writes. “I became ever more intrigued the ways the area had been perceived, interpreted, utilized, exploited and cherished by others who have encountered it. Mono Lake of the twenty first century bears the imprint of all these human activities – some visible, some less so.”

ECM Hosts Local Author Elizabeth Kenneday, “Regarding Mono Lake”

http://www.kibskbov.com/author-at-ecm/

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JA Baseball in CA Cover

Baseball History, World War II & Kerry Yo Nakagawa at Manzanar This Month

The Hidden Legacy of Japanese American Cultural Ambassadors—on the Baseball Diamond.

Four generations of Japanese Americans broke down racial and cultural barriers in California by playing baseball.

JA Baseball in CA Cover
Behind the barbed wire of concentration camps during World War II, baseball became a tonic of spiritual renewal for disenfranchised Japanese Americans who played America’s pastime while illegally imprisoned.
Later, it helped heal resettlement wounds in Los Angeles, San Francisco, the Central Valley and elsewhere.
Today, the names of Japanese American ballplayers still resonate as their legacy continues. Mike Lum was the first Japanese American player in the Major Leagues in 1967, Lenn Sakata the first in the World Series in 1983 and Don Wakamatsu the first manager in 2008.
Join Kerry Yo Nakagawa in this update of his 2001 classic as he chronicles sporting achievements that doubled as cultural benchmarks.
Kerry Yo Nakagawa is founder of the non-profit Nisei Baseball Research Project (NBRP). His earlier works include the book Through a Diamond: 100 Years of Japanese American Baseball and the film American Pastime.
PUB DATE
7.29.14
Baseball, and sports in general, have been a large part of Kerry Yo
Nakagawa’s family legacy. In 1993, Kerry swam from Alcatraz prison
to San Francisco, and in 1994, he played as an all-star for the national
champion Fresno Bandit semipro team.
He is also a black belt in the martial arts and an advanced tennis player. His athletic family history includes his dad, who was a semipro football player and sumo champion, and his uncles—Johnny, Lefty and Mas—who competed with Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, Lefty O’Doul, Jackie Robinson and the all-stars of the Negro League.
His dedication to the NBRP project is well respected and has
morphed into a educational organization to bring awareness and
education about Japanese American concentration camps through theprism of baseball and its many multimedia projects.
The NBRP exhibit “Diamonds in the Rough” has achieved international status and has been shown in such locations as the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown and the Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame in Tokyo. Kerry’s other visions to communicate this story include a documentary with Pat Morita entitled Diamonds in the Rough: Zeni and the Legacy of Japanese American Baseball and the Telly Award–winning educational documentary Site to
Patriotism.
He produced and acted in the award-winning film American Pastime, which is still educating and entertaining teachers and students through its dramatic narrative and specific curriculum.
He is an author, filmmaker, actor, historian, husband and father of two spectacular professional kids.

Kerry Yo Nakagawa at Manzanar

August 30-31Talks: 10 am & 3 pm Saturday, Aug. 30 & 11 am Sunday, Aug. 31

Nakagawa will be available to sign his book in the Manzanar store before and after his programs.
Manzanar National Historic Site5001 U.S. Hwy. 395
Independence, CA 93526

Tel. 760-878-2194 ext. 3310

The Hidden Legacy of Japanese American Cultural Ambassadors—on the Baseball Diamond.

http://www.kibskbov.com/baseball-history-author-at-manzanar/

Eastern Sierra / Japanese American Baseball / History / Japanese American History / Manzanar Historic Site / Concentration Camps / World War ll / Baseball