Category Archives: Community News

tom mix

Lone Pine Film Festival is this weekend

26th Annual Lone Pine Film Festival

Tom Mix, Jack Hoxie, Ken Maynard Return to the Silver Screen at the 26th Annual Lone Pine Film Festival

Film Festival Pres Release:

Yes, Mix, Maynard and Hoxie lead the bill, but the Festival screens and stages for the weekend present a broad spectrum of western Film Fare from Silent, Early and Contemporary Western directors and writers.

The weekend kicks off with a 4:30 PM Reception,  Thursday October 8th at the Museum of Western Film History with early festival guests, celebrities and the local community celebrating another year with America’s Cowboy Balladeer, Don Edwards in Concert at 7:00PM.

Western film screenings start sharply at 7:30 AM on Friday with the 1941 Hoppy film, In Old Colorado, and continue throughout the weekend, with over 20 plus films being screened. We are including the first film shot in Lone Pine, the classic Fatty Arbuckle 1920 4-Reeler, The Round-Up, which will be presented with the piano accompaniment of keyboard specialist J.C. Munns. Munns will also accompany other films for the weekend bringing the incredible keyboard nostalgia to these wonderful silent films as they were originally seen in the movie houses of the 1920’s.

Ed Hulse, Western writer, will be our moderator for panels & discussions featuring Los Angeles Times critic, Kenneth Turan,  Western Film historian, Robert Birchard, screenwriter, Robert Knox, and actors Rex Linn, William Wellman Jr. and  Wyatt McCrea as they provide guests with stimulating memories of films and film making.

Award-winning author editor and AFI film preservationist, Robert S. Birchard will present a program about the earliest days of silent Westerns. Incorporated into the program will be a short documentary film, Bronco Billy, the First Reel Cowboy, produced by the Arkansas Public Broadcasting Service, followed by a discussion of the earliest silent cowboys.

In 1938, Billy King, played child star to William Boyd in four “Hopalong Cassidy Features”. Billy shares wonderful memories of working with Hoppy, Grace Bradley Boyd and shooting in the Alabama Hills.

Join Sylvia Durando in her first public discussion of her Hollywood past as one of movie making’s great stuntwomen. Sylvia, has shared the screen with Elvis Presley, Marlon Brando, Richard Boone, Tony Curtis and Randolph Scott to name a few.

Additional celebrity guests Gary Brown, Diamond Farnsworth, Larry Floyd, Cheryl Rogers, Petrine Day Mitchum, and Bob White complement out weekend with wonderful stories of Western heroes, heroines, horses and even their “cars.”

Twenty-two “On Location,” guided tours celebrate the hundreds of Western films shot in Lone Pine and the incredible, unique landscape of the Alabama Hills.

Team Roping will be featured on Saturday at the Museum rodeo grounds. Sunday will begin with a morning Cowboy Church on the Anchor Ranch, followed by our famous Sunday Main Street Parade. The Closing Campfire led by Cowboy Larry Maurice at Lone Pine Park on Sunday evening will wrap the weekend festivities.

And last but not least, the weekend center of activity, The Museum of Western Film History. The Museum hosts a new name to represent the new and expanded mission of the Museum “to collect, preserve, protect, archive and exhibit original materials of permanent historical value relating to the history and heritage of the American Western film.” The Museum will continue to feature the films made in the Alabama Hills and the Eastern Sierra. Come see our new and updated exhibits, meet our staff, and join our membership, contributing to the Museum’s continued effort and commitment to honor Western film heritage.

Cover Photo, Tom Mix 1937 Restored Cord, photo provided

lone pine film festival, museum of western film history, alabama hills, eastern sierra
mice men

Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men

Run of “Of Mice and Men” starting in Mammoth

Of Mice and Men

October 8-25
Thurs – Sat at 7pm | Sun at 4pm
Edison Theatre, Mammoth


Nobel Prize-winning author, John Steinbecks’s classic comes to the stage. Following two migrant workers as they struggle to realize their own version of the American Dream during the Great Depression.

Two drifters, George and his friend Lennie, with delusions of living off the “fat of the land,” have just arrived at a ranch to work for enough money to buy their own place. Lennie is a man-child, a little boy in the body of a dangerously powerful man. It’s Lennie’s obsessions with things soft and cuddly, that have made George cautious about who the gentle giant, with his brute strength, associates with. His promise to allow Lennie to “tend to the rabbits” on their future land keeps Lennie calm, amidst distractions, as the overgrown child needs constant reassurance. But when a ranch boss’ promiscuous wife is found dead in the barn with a broken neck, it’s obvious that Lennie, albeit accidentally, killed her. George, now worried about his own safety, knows exactly where Lennie has gone to hide, and he meets him there. Realizing they can’t run away anymore, George is faced with a moral question: how should he deal with Lennie before the ranchers find him and take matters into their own hands.

Tickets online: $20/$18/$10
Tickets at the door: $22

To purchase tickets and for more information, visit:

cover photo provided

mammoth lakes news, edison theatre mammoth, of mice and men
inyo forest

Prescribed Burn Planned

Inyo National Forest and Devils Postpile National Monument Announce Plans for Inter-Agency Prescribed Burning

Inyo National Forest (INF) and Devils Postpile National Monument (DEPO) will begin preparations for an interagency prescribed fire on 158 acres in the Reds Meadow Valley, Madera County, CA. The project is located east of the Devils Postpile Ranger Station and west of the Sotcher Lake Day Use Site.

The project goal is to reduce hazardous fuels and thus create wildfire defensible space around the DEPO ranger station, administrative facilities and campground. This defensible space will promote public and firefighter safety should a wildfire occur here in the future.

INF and DEPO will work with the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District to fulfill smoke management objectives and Federal and State air quality standards. The prescribed fire project will occur when weather and fuel moisture conditions will allow for generally low to moderate intensity prescribed burning, likely in the latter half of October 2015. Existing roads and trails will be used as fire containment lines. Fire crews will use chainsaws to thin small trees on 31 acres adjacent to Reds Meadow Road and the DEPO access road. This thinning will moderate risk of fire torching into the tops of larger trees and thus minimize impacts to scenic quality in highly visible areas along the roads.

The access road to Devils Postpile National Monument will be closed along with all trails and access to the Devils Postpile formation during the prescribed burn implementation. Traffic control will be in effect on the Reds Meadow Road during the 2 to 3 days when prescribed burning occurs. Rainbow falls will still be accessible via the Rainbow falls trail during this time.

inyo national forest, devils postpile, reds meadow, rainbow falls, prescribed burning

Dr. Meredick set for healthy lifestyle talk

NIH Healthy Lifestyle Talks continue

Dr. Richard Meredick will give a free talk about Upper Extremity wellness Thursday, Oct. 15, 6:30 p.m. at the Northern Inyo Hospital Birch Street Annex, 2957 Birch St., Bishop.

Dr. Meredick will talk about common hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder injuries and conditions seen most often by our active population. Learn about the signs, symptoms and popular treatment options to reduce pain and discomfort.

This talk is the second in a series of Healthy Lifestyle Talks presented by Northern Inyo Hospital.

Dr. Meredick is a Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon. He specializes in Sports Medicine/Arthroscopy, and Joint Preservation. In his free time, he is an avid skier, hiker, cyclist and rock climber.

cover photo by Gary Young, Dr. Meredick volunteering his time on the sideline at a recent Bishop Union High School Football game

northern inyo hospital, dr richard meredick, healthy lifestyle talk, sports medicine

Manzanar sets new hours

New Hours for Manzanar Visitor Center

Beginning Sunday, October 18, 2015, the Visitor Center at Manzanar National Historic Site will open at 10 a.m. and close at 4:30 p.m. People arriving between 9 and 10 a.m. can visit the exhibits in Block 14’s barracks and mess hall, as well as drive or walk the square-mile site to see Japanese rock gardens and other features. A restroom is available at the historic Manzanar cemetery on the west side of the site. As always, the site itself is open from dawn to dusk.

In prior years, Manzanar went to winter hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. beginning Nov. 1. Current staffing levels have necessitated shorter hours for the Visitor Center, but visitors still have the opportunity to learn about the personal experiences of individuals, families, and communities incarcerated at Manzanar in the nearby barracks. Those exhibits feature extensive photos, documents, and quotes illustrating the challenges and changes people faced at Manzanar. Six audio stations and one video station feature a total of 42 oral history clips.

Exhibits in barracks 1 focus on the early days of Manzanar, when thousands of people arrived to an unfinished camp. Barracks 1 also includes a Block Manager’s office, featuring the papers of Block Manager Chokichi Nakano. Barracks 8 features an “improved” apartment with linoleum and wall board. A second room explores the Loyalty Questionnaire and its profound long-lasting impacts.
Manzanar National Historic Site is located at 5001 Hwy. 395, six miles south of Independence, California. Admission is free.

For further information, please call (760) 878-2194 ext. 3310, visit our website at, or explore their page at

cover photo by Gary Young

manzanar historic site, owens valley history, highway 395

$hort Bishop City Council Meeting

Bishop City Council Meets in Special Session

by Arnie Palu

Three Bishop Police Department items were on the agenda for today’s special meeting of the Bishop City Council. The City Council took action to approve former Chief Chris Carter as short term interim chief. City Administrator Jim Tatum noted that Carter will serve as interim police chief on an as needed basis at a rate of $54.52 per hour. The short term agreement has Carter on board through the month of October. Tatum noted that the department is hoping to have a Lieutenant in place October 26th. Tatum indicated that the new Lieutenant would then serve as interim chief while the 4 to 5 month search for a Police Chief is finalized.

The firm completing that search had their revised contract approved today. The City Council voted 4-0 approving a professional services agreement with Ralph Andersen and Associates for the recruitment of a police chief. The agreement notes the recruitment firm will be paid an amount not to exceed $26,000.

Prior to the third action being addressed, Councilman Joe Pecsi and City Administrator Jim Tatum excused themselves from the council chambers. The third item up for action today centered on the council naming a firm to investigate the claims of a letter signed by 7 members of the Bishop Police Department. The “Letter of No Confidence in Police Chief Chris Carter” was delivered to local media and the city council on September 17th. The letter included accusations against City Administrator Jim Tatum, City Councilman Joe Pecsi, and then Police Chief Chris Carter. Accusations to be included in the investigation will include, but not be limited to, misconduct, violation of established policies, conflict of interest, compliance with a formally negotiated memorandum of understanding, misuse of government resources and violations of the Police Officers Bill of Rights. Following a short discussion the three remaining council members, Karen Schwartz, Mayor Pro-Tem Laura Smith and Mayor Patricia Gardner voted to approve the professional services agreement with Norman Traub Associates. The agreement indicates that the city of Bishop will pay the investigators from Yorba Linda $200 per hour plus expenses. Also, in the event the investigator is required to provide testimony at a post-investigation hearing, deposition or trial, the fee is $250 per hour plus expenses.

Council member Schwartz raised concerns about the expense with Acting Legal Council Peter Tracy indicating the investigation could take months to finalize. Mayor Pro-Tem Smith acknowledged the expense saying however, “This needs to be done”.  Mayor Gardner commented, “We have to look into all the allegations”.   The agreement was approved on a 3-0 vote.

There were zero members of the public at Tuesdays 11am special meeting.
Ted Carleton of the Sheet and myself were the only two in attendance.
Councilman Jim Ellis was absent and excused.
The Bishop City Council will next meet on Tuesday, October 13.

bishop city council, bishop police department, police chief chris carter, bishop california

Dr. Bourne Indicted

Mammoth Doctor Indicted for Removing Archeological Resources

Statement from the Department of Justice

FRESNO, Calif. — Jonathan Cornelius Bourne, 59, of Mammoth Lakes, was arraigned today before United States Magistrate Judge Barbara A. McAuliffe after a federal grand jury returned a 21-count indictment against him, charging him with violations of the Archeological Resources Protection Act, United States Attorney Benjamin B. Wagner announced.

According to counts one through eight of the indictment, in 2010 and 2011, Bourne transported archeological resources from Nevada into California that were found on public lands and were over 100 years old. Among the items removed were obsidian biface tools, Steatite pendants, and glass beads allegedly removed from a tribal cremation and burial site. Counts nine through 14 charge Bourne with unauthorized excavation and removal damage or defacement of archaeological resources in Death Valley National Park, Inyo National Forest, and Sierra National Forest. The Native American cultural artifacts taken in 2010, 2011, and 2014, such as dart points, stone tablets, and a juniper bow stave were over 100 years old.

According to counts 15 through 20 in the indictment, Bourne willfully injured property of the United States by excavating, removing damaging and defacing cultural artifacts on land administered by the United States Forest Service and the National Park Service in the Counties of Mono, Inyo, and Fresno.

“This indictment shows that the prohibited acts including the unauthorized damage, alteration, excavation, and removal of archaeological resources on federally managed public lands is a serious matter,” said U.S. Forest Service Law Enforcement Special Agent Mike Grate.  “We want to thank all the agencies involved for all the hard work in bringing this to closure.”

At the arraignment, Bourne pleaded not guilty to the charges and was released on his own recognizance. His next court hearing is a status conference before United States Magistrate Judge Sheila K. Oberto on December 7, 2015.

This case is the product of an investigation by the United States Forest Service, National Park Service, and the Bureau of Land Management. Assistant United States Attorney Laurel J. Montoya is prosecuting the case.

If convicted, Bourne faces a maximum statutory penalty of 98 years in prison and a $2,030,000 fine. Any sentence, however, would be determined at the discretion of the court after consideration of any applicable statutory factors and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, which take into account a number of variables. The charges are only allegations; the defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

dr bourne, department of justice, inyo national forest, archeological resources, Jonathan Cornelius Bourne
pd big

Special Bishop City Council Meeting Called

Bishop City Council Meeting Tuesday

The Bishop City Council will meet Tuesday, October 6th at 11am.  The Special Meeting has been called to allow the Council to take three action items into consideration.

The agenda for the special meting includes action to approve a interim police chief agreement recently retired, former Chief Chris Carter.  Carter’s final day with the Bishop Police department was Wednesday, September 30th.  The short term interim police Chief agreement would pay Carter $54.52 per hour.  If approved, Carter would serve as interim chief for 30 days.

The second action item would approve a services agreement with Ralph Andersen and Associates for the recruitment of a Chief of Police.  If approved, the agreement would pay the recruitment firm no more than $26,000.

The third and final action item is a services agreement with a firm to investigate the claims of a September 16th “Letter of No Confidence” in then Chief of Police Chris Carter.  The letter signed by 7 members of the Bishop Police Department was addressed to the City Council and local media.  That letter included accusations against City Administrator Jim Tatum and Joe Pecsi and numerous claims against Chief Carter.  Those claims include misconduct, violation of established policies, and conflict of interest.   If approved by the city council Tuesday, the contact with Norman Traub Associates of Yorba Linda would pay the investigator $200 per hour plus expenses.  The City Council agenda indicates the cost of the investigation will be paid through the City’s general fund.

City of Bishop, Bishop California Police Department, chief chris carter, jim tatum, joe pecsi


Harry Andreas Sr.

Harry Andreas Sr. 1938-2015

Harry William Andreas Sr. was born on February 12, 1938 to the late Willie and Ester Andreas in Schurz NV. Harry passed away on October 2, 2015 in Bishop, CA., surrounded by family he went to be home with the Lord Jesus Christ whom he proudly served. Grampa Harry as everyone called him, touched the hearts of a lot of people. He was a very talented man who had a lot of hobbies during his walk on earth. “Grandpa” Harry was a great gardener and every year you could catch him sitting somewhere with a ice chest full of tomatoes and chilies, ready to sell them to anybody who wanted to buy some. Then it was off to the river to fish, that was another one of his passions. He would also, tie fishing flies that many of us would use for fishing, he also sold them to the local sporting goods stores along with anyone who wanted to use them. Grampa Harry’s greatest passion was his love for playing music with family and friends and was very proud to play music with his son Harry Jr. and grandsons Jeffrey and the late Harry III. Grandpa’s band was the great Harry Casino and The Gamblers Band” singing and playing favorites like Boney Maroney, White Lightening and Silver Wings. Grampa worked a lot of jobs in his lifetime, but the job he loved the most was Asphalt work, working along with family and friends until he retired and then it was “Fish On”. Gramp liked to fish at pyramid Lake and would take anyone who wanted to go. He caught a 13.5 Lb. cutthroat and received a certificate from the Nevada Fish and Game for it. It was then we all had to go fish Pyramid Lake, but Grampa still caught the biggest fish. Grampa Harry is preceded in death by his father Willie and mother Ester, brothers Robert, Donald (Dan), Clarence and Richie, grandson Harry W. Andreas III and nephew Michael Andreas, sisters Mary and Virginia. He is survived by wife Doris, daughter Jill, sons Richard Sr. and Harry Jr. and his wife Clarice, granddaughters Marnie, Jordan and Vonna, grandsons Jeffrey, Richard Jr. and Thomas also, brother John Sr. and his wife Felicia and great grandson Keiji Andreas, along with numerous cousins, nephews, nieces and friends. Grampa will be greatly missed by all of us. We love you “Grampa Harry”. There will be a Cry Dance on Thursday at Dusk at 661 Sewaye Lane on October 8. Services will be held Friday, October 9 at 11:00 Am at the Barlow Lane Gymnasium. Interment will follow at Sunland Cemetery. Luncheon to follow after the interment at the Barlow Gymnasium.

Harry Andreas Sr.


Playhouse 395’s Murder Mystery

Playhouse 395 presents “Eat, Drink and be Murdered”

Playhouse 395 is proud to announce a special fall dinner murder mystery presentation “Eat, Drink and be Murdered”. This dinner show will be presented at the Mountain Rambler Brewery on Monday October 12th and Monday October 19th. The mystery begins at 6:30 when the McFadden’s and O’Riley’s get together to commemorate the 80th birthday of their family matriarch, Grandma Rose.

A distillery vat drowning, a secret ingredient and feuding families will make this a night to remember. Tickets are $40 each and include a delicious dinner, the theatre show and prizes awarded to the lucky dinner guest who correctly guesses the murderer and the motive.

Tickets are now available at the Mountain Rambler Brewery on South Main Street but seats are limited so be sure to purchase yours soon!

playhouse 395, mountain rambler brewery, bishop california