KIBS/KBOV Announcements

People Are Stealing Donations From IMAH Sierra Thrift Mall. Seriously?

News and Sports Director, Bradford Evans sits down with Executive Director of Inyo-Mono Association for the Handicapped, Beth Himelhoch to interview her about the problem of residents of Bishop stealing donations.  You can find the interview in the link below. https://soundcloud.com/user-627742700/imah-sierra-thirft-mall-stolen-property

Customer Water Leaks Identified by MCWD’s Advanced Metering Infrastructure

During the summer of 2014, the Mammoth Community Water District (District) upgraded to new meters that wirelessly transmit data using remote collectors. This advanced technology allows the District to see hourly usage of all water meters on the distribution system. Utilizing software developed by WaterSmart, a data analytics company, the District is able to run a report that details leaks and alert customers accordingly.

“We are thrilled to have the ability to help our customers protect their property and save an exorbitant amount of water,” said Irene Yamashita, Principal Analyst. “It has been a learning experience to determine what size leaks should be flagged, what patterns are associated with various sources of leaks and how to best introduce the information to the customers.”

Typically, the District calls two to five customers or property managers a day with leaks ranging from 15 to 1,500 gallons per hour. “About 80 percent of leaks we call on are caused by toilets. Customers are usually surprised to learn that leaking toilets can waste 600+ gallons per hour (over 14,000 gallons per day), ” described Betty Hylton, Administrative Analyst. “In winter, we find a number of leaks caused by shedding snow that turns on or breaks hose bibs and frozen pipes that break. Despite the cause of the leak, customers are generally very grateful that we have this capability and take the time to notify them.”

The District recommends that customers (or property managers) look and listen for the leak first. If unable to identify where the water is leaking, then call a plumber. The District has offered two Leak Detection courses for plumbers and property managers to learn the most efficient process for leak detection and maintains a supply of coloring dye tabs to check for toilet leaks.

The Mammoth Lakes community is limited to local surface and groundwater resources in our basin. The leak detection program conserves water that would otherwise be wasted and develops positive relationships with our customers. The District is proud to have this advanced capability, however customers remain responsible for identifying water leaks at their property. An online customer portal is available to provide customers the ability to look at their hourly water use from their computer, and receive high usage alerts by signing up for WaterSmart here: https://mcwd.watersmart.com/index.php/welcome

OVGA requests Statements of Interest from groups who wish to participate in groundwater sustainability planning

The OVGA is currently soliciting Statements of Interest from local individuals, entities or groups interested in participating as an “Interested Party,” which has a voting interest in the OVGA Board. The OVGA was created to comply with California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) requirement that local agencies sustainably manage groundwater in the Owens Valley Groundwater Basin. The basin includes the Owens, Round, Chalfant, Hammil, and Benton Valleys as well as Fish Slough.

An OVGA “Interested Party” may be comprised of an individual, entity, group, or combination thereof. Statement of Interest forms are available online at http://www.inyowater.org/projects/sgma/ or from the Inyo County Water Department, P.O. Box 337, 135 S. Jackson St., Independence CA. The Statement of Interest forms include instructions and request necessary information for the OVGA to assess the interest and desired level of participation of local groups. The deadline to submit a Statement of Interest form is February 28, 2019. Completing the forms does not constitute an application for Interested Party status. The OVGA may request and consider formal applications at a later time.

Specific information regarding the OVGA joint powers agreement that describes the roles and responsibilities of Interested Parties is available on the Inyo County Water Department website (inyowater.org) or by contacting the Inyo County Water Department (lpiper@inyocounty.us, 760-878-0001).

Rosemarie Martha Thornton Obituary

Rosemarie Martha Thornton 1931-2019

Rosemarie Martha Thornton 87, of Big Pine passed on January 3, 2019 of a massive stroke .

Rose as her friends knew her was born to Joseph J. and Catherine Mayer on January 21, 1931 in Los Angeles Ca.

She was married to Charles ( Chuck ) Thornton on February 4, 1949 . Chuck and Rose spent 30 years in Norwalk CA. before moving to Big Pine CA. in 1988 .

Rose was preceded in death by her husband Charles Thornton on March 5, 2001 .

She is survived by her daughter Lisa and husband Patrick Perkins of Bishop where Rose spent her last year of her life.

She is also survived by her grandson Jason Perkins of Carson City NV., and Alex and wife Jordan Perkins and two great-granddaughters Madison 8 and Kielei 6 of Virginia.

She is survived by her brother Steve, twin sisters Barbra and Beatrice and many nieces and nephews.

A luncheon will be held at the United Methodist Church in Big Pine on Saturday, January 19, 2019 at 11:00 am, followed by a graveside service at 1:00 pm at Big Pine Cemetery 600 West Crocker Ave. Big Pine CA. 93513

Mary Mae Kilpatrick to lead NIHD Board of Directors in 2019

The Northern Inyo Healthcare District Board of Directors named its 2019 slate of officers during its December board meeting. Long-time Bishop area educator and school administrator Mary Mae Kilpatrick was elected Board President with retired county Heath and Human Services Director Jean Turner being named Vice President.

Kilpatrick represents Zone IV of the Healthcare District, covering the greater West Bishop area. A 61-year resident of Bishop, Kilpatrick also serves on the NIH Foundation Board of Directors.

“I am honored to work alongside everyone at NIHD,” Kilpatrick said. “We have such an outstanding group of people at the District. Our staff’s continuing priority is to always put our patient’s care and safety first. On top of that, they are compassionate in the care they provide, and they are also a very giving team who do their best to live up to NIHD’s mission of ‘improving our communities, one life at a time.”

Turner represents Zone II, which covers the Northern Bishop area. Her experience includes extensive administrative oversight of various health and human service programs providing care to children, adults, families and senior citizens.

Robert Sharp, who represents Zone III, which covers a large portion of the downtown Bishop area, will serve as Board Secretary. As Vice President of Eastern Sierra Community Bank, Sharp manages and develops the Bishop, Mammoth Lakes, and Bridgeport branches.

Local attorney Peter Tracy, Zone I representative, will serve as Board Treasurer. Tracy, perhaps best known for his 33-years of service as legal counsel to the City of Bishop, represents the West Bishop, McLaren Lane, Rocking K, Starlight, and Aspendell areas.

Outgoing Board President and Zone V Director MC Hubbard, who represents parts of southeastern Bishop, Wilkerson, Big Pine, and Aberdeen, will serve as the Member-At-Large. Hubbard is a retired banking executive.

At the board meeting Dr. Kevin S. Flanigan, MD MBA, the District’s Chief Executive Officer, congratulated each of the new officers. Later, he described the role of the Board as one of governance, noting they are charged with setting the strategic goals; overseeing the progress toward those goals; and, ensuring the continued access to local healthcare services for their constituents.

BLM reduces Tuttle Creek Campground winter rates in the Alabama Hills


LONE PINE, Calif. – The Bureau of Land Management Bishop Field Office is reducing the nightly camping fee at the Tuttle Creek Campground from $8 per night to $5 per night starting Friday, December 21. The campground fee will return to the standard $8 per night rate in April 2019.

 “Tuttle Creek Campground provides a great base camp for visitors looking to hike,climb, explore and sight see in and around the Alabama Hills Recreation and Scenic Area,” says BLM Bishop Field Manager Steve Nelson.

The Tuttle Creek Campground is located about four- and one-half miles west of Lone Pine in the southern portion of the Alabama Hills. At more than 5,000 feet elevation, the campground includes 83 recreational vehicle and tent sites that boast impressive views of Mt.Whitney, Lone Pine Peak and Mt. Williamson in the Sierra Nevada to the west. The campground also provides easy access to Movie Flat and other popular destinations in the Alabama Hills. Campground amenities include trash collection, vault toilets, picnic tables, fire rings and lantern holders. No water is available during the winter. One group site and two horse corrals are available with reservations.

 The BLM is reducing the fee at Tuttle Creek Campground to encourage visitors to stay in developed campsites, while exploring the Alabama Hills. Visitor use in theAlabama Hills has nearly doubled in the last eight years. Dispersed campsites inthe Alabama Hills can be difficult to find, especially during the weekend and on holidays. Tuttle Creek Campground provides a nearby, inexpensive and environmentally responsible alternative to dispersed camping.

“By staying in the campground, visitors can do their part to minimize camping impacts and maintain the great scenery and outstanding recreational opportunities that make the hills a special place to visit,” says Nelson.

 As stewards, the BLM manages public lands for the benefit of current and future generations, supporting conservation in pursuit of its multiple-use mission. For more information, please visit https://www.blm.gov/visit/search-details/15191/1 or contact the Bishop Field Office at 760-872-5000.

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.

-BLM-

Bishop Field Office, 351 Pacu Lane, Suite 100, Bishop, CA  93514

Mammoth Lakes Tourism Hires New Marketing Director

Mammoth Lakes Tourism Welcomes New Director of Marketing

Matt Gebo returns to Mammoth Lakes to take on role

 

Mammoth Lakes, Calif. (Dec. 12, 2018) – Mammoth Lakes Tourism has hired a new Director of Marketing. Former Mammoth Lakes’ resident, Matt Gebo was chosen for the position from a field of more than 100 applicants. Gebo lived in Mammoth Lakes in 2010-11 and worked as Marketing Programs Director for Mammoth Mountain.

 

“Mammoth Lakes is truly a special place that offers so much both recreationally and professionally for me,” Gebo said. “I’m most excited to experience all the things that have changed over the last 7 years or so, getting back out on the ski and hiking trails, and connecting with friends and colleagues, old and new.”

Gebo brings a wide breadth of experience in resort towns where he has seen what works well to drive the local economy in a positive direction.

He served as Marketing Manager for American Skiing Company and Senior Marketing Manager for Colorado Ski Company. He also worked as the Director of Marketing for Park City Mountain Resort, and most recently has been running his own consulting agency, MG Marketing. Additionally Matt has been a member of the Taos Ski Valley Chamber Board of Directors, as well as the Park City Chamber Board of Directors, among many other things.

“My experience working closely with Visit Park City and Visit Taos Ski Valley, both as members of the Board of Directors and on marketing/public relations committees, gives me a unique understanding that a wider view needs to be taken in an organization like MLT,” Gebo said. “The biggest difference [between working for the ski resort and the local DMO] is having a more holistic view of all the things the town offers, not just within the resort ecosystem.

“My immediate goals are to reconnect with the community, work with the whole MLT team to define the goals for the year for Mammoth Lakes Tourism, and continue to tell the unique stories that make this place so special and drive more visitation to town in the ‘need periods,’” he added.

“Having served on the recruiting committee, I am proud to have been a part of the process in hiring Matt Gebo for MLT marketing director,” said MLT Board member Michael Ledesma. “In addition to decades of executive marketing experience, Matt’s career path has largely been in the mountain resort industry including but not limited to Taos, Park City, Mount Snow and the Canyons. Matt has lived at altitude most of his life, has worked here in Mammoth Lakes previously (MMSA) and has even crossed paths with our Executive Director John Urdi at American Ski Company back in the late 90’s. Beyond Matt’s award winning resume, he has excellent interpersonal skills and will be a great fit not only at MLT but in our community as well!”

Multiple Lone Pine Residents Win National FFA Awards

Brenda Lacey the FFA Advisor of the Lone Pine High School FFA Chapter. Was recently awarded the Honorary American FFA Degree at the 2018 National Convention & Expo during an onstage ceremony on Friday, Oct. 26 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Mrs. Lacey received a certificate and medal, and their name will be permanently recorded at the National FFA Center.

This award is given to those who advance agricultural education and FFA through outstanding personal commitment. The National FFA Organization works to enhance the lives of youth through agricultural education. Without the efforts of highly dedicated individuals, thousands of young people would not be able to achieve the success that, in turn, contributes directly to the overall well being of the nation.

Also receiving National FFA Awards where Katie Lacey a 2016 Lone Pine High Graduate who is currently a junior at Oklahoma State University studying Agricultural Business/Pre-Law. Katie was recognized as the California FFA Star American Farmer receiving a Gold Medal along with her American FFA Degree. Tinh LeTrung a 2017 Lone Pine High Graduate a sophomore at Cerro Coso Community College received his American FFA Degree.

As the highest degree achievable in the National FFA Organization, the American FFA degree shows an FFA member’s dedication to his or her chapter and state FFA association. American FFA Degree recipients show promise for the future and have gone above and beyond to achieve excellence.

Recipients received a certificate and the American FFA Degree key in honor of their accomplishments and dedication to FFA.

The Lone Pine FFA Chapter had six current members in attendance at the 91st National FFA Convention and Expo, which drew a record 69,944 attendees to Indianapolis for this year’s themed convention “Just One”. Jessica McGuire, Kaili Hykes, Jaye Eaton, Luke Sullivan, Daniel Miller, and Fernando Rodriguez were in attendance for all of the leadership sessions, keynote speakers, and the National FFA Expo. In addition the students spent time at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, toured Purdue University, and explored the beautiful city of Indianapolis.

The National FFA Organization provides leadership, personal growth and career success training through agricultural education to 669,989 student members who belong to one of 8,630 local FFA chapters throughout the U.S., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Bergin Islands. The national FFA Organization is the premier youth organization dedicated to preparing members for leadership and careers in the science, business and technology of agriculture. FFA members are the future food industry’s premier human capital, and they are all driven by the organization’s foundational motto: Learning to Do, Doing to Learn, Earning to Live, Living to Serve.

Ella Scott Calkins Obituary

Ella Scott Calkins 1919 – 2018

Ella “Bobbie” Calkins, 99, born April 29, 1919 in New Zealand and passed away in Bishop, CA on November 27, 2018.

She was preceded in death by her husband; Don Calkins, and she is survived by her daughter; Gail Arcularius and her husband Will of Cedar City, Utah, and by her son Robert Calkins  of Wellington, Nevada, and Grandchildren; Gregory August, Bob August, Tina Mosey and Angie Wray,  and 3 great grandchildren; Koyl Mosey, Dimitri Wray and Axel Wray.

Bobbie became a war bride when she met & married U.S. Marine Captain Don Calkins while his unit was on maneuvers in New Zealand preparing for numerous island assaults in the Pacific.  After the war Don worked for his family’s newspaper syndicate in the Central Valley of California and then they moved to Bishop with their daughter, Gail, in 1951.

There will be a graveside service at the East Line St. Cemetery on Saturday, December 1st at 11:00 AM.  She and her husband Don will be together again side by side.

Dos Palos Routs the Broncos

The Bishop Broncos season has come to a close. Arnie Palu’s team were unable to advance to the second round of CIF Central Section play, losing 41-6 to the Dos Palos Broncos.

Bishop were unable to stop Dos Palos, who were big, physical, and fast. The Broncos of the Western Sierra dominated the game from start to finish.

 

In the first quarter, Dos Palos were able to score on their opening possession, thanks to a Ronald Johnson 50 yard run. Johnson took the ball to the right side and was surrounded by a sea of blue, but was somehow able to cut back inside and take it to the house making it 7-0.

The Merrell to Merrell connection provided Dos Palos with even more of an advantage, when quarterback, Michael Merrell found his brother, Zane Merrell for a reception inside the five yard line. The ball was placed on the one yard line, and fullback, Ryan Ramirez punched it in, giving Dos Palos a 14-0 lead.

Bishop were thrown a lifeline when it was 21-0, thanks to standout cornerback, Mark Mayhugh intercepting the ball in his own endzone for his ninth pick of the season. This accomplishment allowed Mayhugh to become the second ranked player in the state of California pertaining to interceptions.

Mayhugh get the INT

The senior defensive back finished his season just one interception away from tying state leader, Chase Jones of Mission Prep in San Luis Obisbo, who leads all players in the state with ten interceptions.

Although Mayhugh was able to cause a turnover, the Broncos were unable to capitalize. Bishop turned the ball over going the other way, after a pass was intended for Mark Mayhugh, but was intercepted after a deflection.

It wasn’t until late in the game that the Broncos were finally able to score. Sophomore quarterback, Clay Omohundro threw an arching pass right into the hands of Mayhugh, who went in for the score.

Mayhugh with the lone TD for the Broncos

After the game, Coach Palu praised the opposition’s efforts saying,Tough way to end a fine season. Hats off to Dos Palos they played well and took advantage of our miscues.” Although Palu was disappointed with the result, he heaped praise on his team’s coaching staff and players when he said. “Thank you to our seniors for their hard work and dedication to the program. Thank you to our wonderful coaching staff and their families for their time and dedication to our kids.”

The Broncos finished their season with a 7-4 record. Many key players will be returning next year, including Tristan Valle, Luke McClean, Steven Paco, and Wesley Pettet.