All posts by Team

Inyo County Accepting Grants for Community Projects

INYO COUNTY ACCEPTING COMMUNITY PROJECT SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM GRANTS

Inyo County is accepting grant applications from non-profit groups and organizations in the county seeking funding for programs, projects or events taking place from the time the grants are awarded later this year to June 30, 2015.

There is $95,000 worth of grant funding available in this cycle of Inyo County Community Project Sponsorship Program grants. The Inyo County Board of Supervisors approved the $95,000 in CPSP grant funding when it recently approved the fiscal year 2014-15 county budget.

Crowd at the Blake Jones Trout Derby, an event that has received Grant Funding
Crowd at the Blake Jones Trout Derby, an event that has received Grant Funding

Over the past seven years, Inyo County CPSP grants have provided funds to county based non-profits to help sponsor events ranging from marathons to fishing derbies, contributed to projects as diverse as web page redesign and printing of promotional brochures, and paid for advertising that promotes local and regional events and programs.

The CPSP program is focused on helping local organizations promote activities and programs that bring visitors to the area, and also supports events and programs that enhance the cultural and recreational quality of life of the county’s residents.

The Program Guidelines and Grant Application forms are available online at the Inyo County website, under Community Project Sponsorship Program, at www.inyocounty.us/Comm_Proj_Spon/CPSP.htm.

The deadline for applying for the Community Project Sponsorship Fall Grant Cycle is Friday, Oct. 17, 2014.

To be considered, three copies of the completed grant application, each with an original signature, must be received by the Office of the County Administrator by 5 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 17, 2014.

No postmarks or facsimile copies will be accepted. Digital grant applications, which still need original signatures, may be sent to jklusmire@inyocounty.us or lpiper@inyocounty.us.

Organizations or groups with questions about the grant guidelines, the application process or the program in general can call Jon Klusmire at 760-878-0258 for more information.

Grant applications being mailed should be sent to: Office of the County Administrator, Attn: Community Project Sponsorship Program, P.O. Drawer N, Independence, CA 93526. If hand delivering, deliver to: Office of the County Administrator, 224 N. Edwards Street, Independence, CA, (760) 878-0292.

Grant applications deemed complete and eligible will be forwarded to a Review Panel for evaluation, ranking and suggested funding levels. The Board of Supervisors is expected to consider the Review Panel’s funding recommendations and make a final decision on the specific grant awards toward the beginning of November.

###

INYO COUNTY ACCEPTING COMMUNITY PROJECT SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM GRANTS

http://www.kibskbov.com/inyocountygrants/

Inyo County / Owens Valley / Eastern Sierra / Community Project Sponsorship Program Grants / Grant Funding / Tourism / History / Culture / Recreation / Local / Programs / Events / Non-Profit Organizations

Hallenbeck Accepts Promotion as new Chief of the Division of Traffic Operations in Sacramento

District 9 Director Tom Hallenbeck Appointed Chief of the Division of Traffic Operations in Sacramento

District 9 Director Tom Hallenbeck Appointed Chief of the Division of Traffic Operations in Sacramento
District 9 Director Tom Hallenbeck Appointed Chief of the Division of Traffic Operations in Sacramento
Bishop – The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) is proud to announce the promotion of Tom Hallenbeck, District 9 Director.  Tom has accepted the position of Chief of the Division of Traffic Operations in Sacramento, Ca. effective October 1, 2014.
 
Tom started with Caltrans right after graduating from Union College with a Civil Engineering degree.  He began his career in the Office of Structures, Design & Construction working on bridge projects throughout the state.  In 1997 he accepted the position of District 9 Director in Bishop, CA.  
 
About his time as District 9 Director in Bishop, Tom stated, “It has been an honor and pleasure to serve the people of the Eastern Sierra for the last 17 years.  I am excited about taking on new challenges but also sad to leave the Bishop community that we have been a part of and raised our family in.  I look back on many accomplishments but look forward to the innovations and applications that will change the way we drive.”
 
Tom also stated that during his tenure in District 9, “We have responded to floods, fires and avalanches.  We have rehabilitated every rest area and almost every “Main Street” in the district and left them more accessible and more complete.  We have expanded and improved the US 395/SR 14 corridor, and by so doing, saved countless lives.  It has been a privilege to be a part of helping improve and maintain the El Camino Sierra and all of the roads in District 9. 
 
District 9 Director Tom Hallenbeck Appointed Chief of the Division of Traffic Operations in Sacramento
District 9 Director Tom Hallenbeck Appointed Chief of the Division of Traffic Operations in Sacramento
In his new position as the Chief of the Division of Traffic Operations, Tom will perform technical activities in support of the program and local agencies, respond to incidents on State highways, provide traffic design and support for project delivery, and integrate new technology and innovations into our system that will change the way we travel on our highways.
###

District 9 Director Tom Hallenbeck Appointed Chief of the Division of Traffic Operations in Sacramento

www.kibskbov.com/hallenbeckacceptspromotion/

Bishop / District 9 /Director / Caltrans / Traffic Operations / Chief / Promotion / Eastern Sierra / Owens Valley / Sacramento

Death Valley Scotty, Live Radio Play in Lone Pine

Metabolic Studio Presents Radio Play in Lone Pine About Death Valley Scotty & his Castle

On Sunday September 28 at 7pm, the Metabolic Studio IOU Theater invites the public to experience, “DEATH VALLEY SCOTTY,” a live radio play that was written by Ruth Woodman in 1931 and originally aired in 1955 in the “Death Valley Days” Series.

This marks the fourth play in the IOU Theatre series, which began in June 2014 with readings of radio plays about the Owens Valley and surrounding area.

Walter Scott (a.k.a. Death Valley Scotty) was a prospector, a performer with Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show, a raconteur, a conman, husband and father. In 1885 he met an Easterner who was told he only had a few weeks to live. Scotty helped him to recover and cemented a secretive, life long partnership. In 1905 he beat the cross- country speed record on a train from L.A. to Chicago.

Free with his stories and his cash, he quickly became one of the West’s most prominent and mysterious legends and kept reporters and the country on the edge of its seat for decades. His fabulous stories of secret gold mines and his million-dollar oasis in Death Valley (Scotty’s Castle) kept the public and newspapermen eager for the next story.

A troupe of local performers from Bishop to Keeler will read the play and perform live music and sound effects. The radio play is free to the public and will be staged at 7 p.m., Sunday September 28, the Double L Tavern, at the corner of Main and Willow, in Lone Pine.

Those under 21 can watch a live broadcast of the performance at the IOU garden next to the Double L.

The garden will also host an Open House from 5-7p.m.

Sunday with IOU espresso being served along with an offering grown in the IOU garden.

For more information visit:

MetabolicStudioIOUTheatre on Facebook and metabolicstudio.org.

 

Metabolic Studio Presents Radio Play in Lone Pine About Death Valley Scotty & his Castle

http://www.kibskbov.com/deathvalleyscottyradioplay/

Metabolic Studio IOU Theater / Lone Pine / Eastern Sierra / Death Valley / Death Valley Scotty / History / Owens Valley / Bishop / Keeler / Locals / Performers / Radio Play / Death Valley Series / Lone Pine TV
The Otteson's World Famous Turquoise

The Otteson’s World Famous Turquoise in Tonopah

The Otteson’s World Famous Turquoise, The Royston Turquoise Mine, & a Must-Do in the Silver State of Nevada…

Travel Nevada recently experienced what they refer to as “one of the most authentic Nevada experiences you could ask for.” And, they know exactly what they’re talking about.

Turquoise at the Otteson's Royston Turquoise Mine
Turquoise at the Otteson’s Royston Turquoise Mine

Turquoise Mining

Royston Turquoise is known for its distinction of endless hues world wide. A wide range of Turquoise colors from beautiful soft blues to emerald greens often run together in the same rock, creating some of the most spectacular Turquoise stones on Earth.

Royston Turquoise
Royston Turquoise

The Royston Mine is one of the last American mines in operation today.

After relocating their family to the Tonopah area in 1958, the Otteson family has been running a gamut on the turquoise industry since. The Royston Turquoise Mine separates itself with distinction, as it is known worldwide for having a wide range of colors. While the deeper aquamarine hues are considered to be the most valuable, visitors can find just about every hue of blue greens at the Royston Turquoise Mine. From emerald greens to soft baby blues, the beauty truly is in the eye of the beholder and visitors will have the luxury of collection whatever they please.  – See more at: http://travelnevada.com/discover/immersive-experiences/ottesons-turquoise-royston-mine#sthash.6ljqPjLn.dpuf
Best yet, Tonopah lies just in between Reno and Las Vegas, which means it’s a manageable escape from the big city. Tours begin at the Otteson Turquoise Jewelry shop, where visitors will carpool out to the Royston Turquoise Mine, a short 30 minute drive from the Mizpah.  – See more at: http://travelnevada.com/discover/immersive-experiences/ottesons-turquoise-royston-mine#sthash.6ljqPjLn.dpuf

HISTORY: The Otteson Family & The Royston Turquoise Mine

The Otteson family has been running a gamut on the Turquoise industry since they relocated to the Tonopah area in 1958.

Controlling the majority of the Royston Turquoise mining district, most of their days are spent excavating this beautiful gemstone. Visitors have the opportunity to dig and sort through Turquoise-laden mounds with hands-on-tours with the Ottesons themselves.

Miner digging out turquoise

Tractor over Turquoise vein at Royston Mine
Tractor over Turquoise vein at Royston Mine

dynamite

Tours

$100 per person

$50 Ages 14-18

Kids Under 8 are Free

Tours are held Wednesday – Saturday from April to October and run from 10 AM until 2 PM.

The tours begin and end at the Otteson’s Showroom in the vault of Tonopah’s historic Mizpah Hotel. Visitors may each fill one large bag for collection during their mining experience. After three hours of getting their hands dirty at the mine, the group is brought back to the Showroom at the Mizpah. Here, the Otteson’s personally help sort, cut, and polish your most valuable finds.

The Otteson's World Famous Turquoise
The Otteson’s World Famous Turquoise Showroom at the Mizpah Hotel
turquoise mining at royston mine
Turquoise Mining at Royston Mine with the Ottesons

Guests also have the option of having their turquoise transformed into handmade jewelry.

filing down the turquoise

In fact, the Discovery Channel’s Kirsten Gum of “Where to Find Cash & Treasures” and “Treasure Hunter” featured her turquoise mining experience with the Ottesons on TV. One of her finds is displayed in the Showroom at the Mizpah.

Mining with The Ottesons at the Royston Turquoise Mine; A Must See and Do in the Silver State

100 N. Main Street

Tonopah, NV 89049

Phone:(775) 482-9889

The Otteson’s World Famous Turquoise, The Royston Turquoise Mine, & a Must-Do in the Silver State of Nevada…

Tonopah / Nevada / Turquoise / Royston / Authentic / Mining / Mine / Ottesons / Travel / Tourism / Tours / Experience / Travel Channel / Travel Nevada / Silver State / West Central Nevada / Mizpah Hotel
“The highlight of our trip to Death Valley!” -Heidi P., Waukesha, Wisconsin

You wouldn’t know it, but the hills in the Tonopah area are riddled with unimaginable amounts of turquoise. With a retail store and tour office located in the alluring Mizpah Hotel in downtown Tonopah, plan ahead for one of the most authentic Nevada experiences you could ask for: turquoise mining. Best yet, Tonopah lies just in between Reno and Las Vegas, which means it’s a manageable escape from the big city. Tours begin at the Otteson Turquoise Jewelry shop, where visitors will carpool out to the Royston Turquoise Mine, a short 30 minute drive from the Mizpah.

After relocating their family to the Tonopah area in 1958, the Otteson family has been running a gamut on the turquoise industry since. The Royston Turquoise Mine separates itself with distinction, as it is known worldwide for having a wide range of colors. While the deeper aquamarine hues are considered to be the most valuable, visitors can find just about every hue of blue greens at the Royston Turquoise Mine. From emerald greens to soft baby blues, the beauty truly is in the eye of the beholder and visitors will have the luxury of collection whatever they please. 

As the Otteson’s control the majority of the Royston Turquoise mining district, they spend most of their days excavating this beautiful gemstone which is then processed, sorted and then sold to silversmiths around the world. Just like the Otteson’s, visitors will have the chance to dig and sort through turquoise-laden mounds, almost as far as the eye can see. 

With each guest allotted one large bag for collection, they will spend three unforgettable hours prospecting their own finds. Afterward, visitors will be brought back to the Mizpah where the Otteson’s sort through your best pieces, ultimately cutting and polishing your most valuable stones. One thing is for certain, each guest will most definitely walk away with many stones. The question isn’t if you’ll find it, but how much of it and what grade you will uncover! The experience really comes full circle when guests are presented the option of having their turquoise transformed into jewelry, having the resident silversmith create your favorite bauble.

Before you secure your spot, be sure you’re prepped for the elements and remember to bring sunscreen, gloves, closed toed shoes, proper clothing [as weather may rapidly change], and lots of drinking water. Tours and held on Wednesday and Saturday during the warmer months of April through October. These four hour tours typically last from 10:00am to 2:00pm, and take you into the mine where several generations of the family owned operation reworking to excavate their own findings. As it is a modern operable mine, visitors are presented with a multitude of digging tools and a safety schpeel.

It doesnt get much more authentic with a Nevada experience like this. Definitely a must-see and do in the Silver State! 

Features

  • $100 Per Person
  • $50 Children 14-18
  • Kids under 8 Free
  • Tours held Weds and Sat April-Oct
  • Tours run from 10am-2pm

- See more at: http://travelnevada.com/discover/immersive-experiences/ottesons-turquoise-royston-mine#sthash.6ljqPjLn.dpuf

Obituary: Andrea J. Garrison-Erickson

Andrea J. Garrison- Erickson

Andrea Erickson
Andrea Erickson

Jan 7, 1952 – Sep. 10, 2014

Andrea J. Garrison- Erickson, 62, of Coleville, CA passed away on September 10, 2014 at her home on the Garrison Ranch in Antelope Valley, Coleville.

Andrea was born on January 7, 1952 in Schurz, Nevada to Andrew “Andy” Garrison and Gertrude Tom-Garrison of Coleville, CA.

From a very early age Andrea was the picture of strength and determination. After recovering from childhood arthritis, she went on to lead the typical life of a child growing up on a ranch; horseback riding, playing in the fields, and keeping her siblings in line.

In adulthood, Andrea took pride in the raising of her own family. A firm believer in providing for her family, she was employed in many different capacities of office administration. She worked for Mono County, Department of interior (Office of Special Trustee), Toiyabe Indian Health Project and the Department of the Navy. For many years she served with distinction on the Toiyabe Indian Health Project Board of Directors proudly representing the Antelope Valley Indian Community. In her retirement, she enjoyed following the family and tribal tradition of irrigating the family’s agricultural fields.

Andrea’s many hobbies included; playing fast and slow pitch softball, walking/running, gardening and beading. Her absolute favorite things in life were spending time with her family which included; outdoor activities, spending time at Topaz Lake during the summer, and exploring the nearby beautiful mountains scouting for firewood, pinenuts and berries. She will be dearly missed by many, especially her family.

Andrea joins her daughter Angela Fredericks, father Andy Garrison, mother Gertrude Tom-Garrison, and brother Antone Garrison, who preceded her in passing. She is survived by husband Joel Erickson, son John Fredericks and daughter in law Christine Hunt-Fredericks, son Jerome Fredericks and daughter in law Tavoosee Eddy-Fredericks, son Jacob Erickson, and grandchildren Hai-wee and Sai-yah Fredericks, and her sisters, and numerous nieces and nephews.

A traditional Paiute Cry Dance will be held on Friday September 19, 2014 at the Garrison Ranch beginning at dusk. Funeral services will be commenced at the Coleville Methodist Church at noon on Saturday September 20, 2014 with burial to proceed after at the Antelope Valley Cemetery in Coleville. Fellowship will follow and be held at the Walker Community Center in Walker, CA.

 

Sinnamon Meadows 1

The Eastern Sierra Land Trust Makes Breaking News

Breaking News: Historic Sinnamon Meadows Property now Permanently Protected by ESLT

1,240 Acres of Ranch Land and Important Wildlife Habitat Preserved Forever

Sinnamon Meadows 1
With the assistance of important funding partners and the support of concerned landowners, ESLT has successfully protected this spectacularly beautiful and historically-important working landscape in northern Mono County. Photo Credit: Stephen Ingram.

Eastern Sierra Land Trust (ESLT) has achieved another success in its efforts to preserve the Eastern Sierra’s cherished landscapes.

ESLT is thrilled to announce the permanent protection of Sinnamon Meadows, a stunning expanse of historic ranchland in northern Mono County. The 1,240-acre property’s working lands, extensive wetlands, natural springs, and vital animal habitat are now protected forever with an agricultural conservation easement held by ESLT. Thanks to the foresight of the property’s landowners, the efforts of ESLT, and the assistance of important funding partners, Sinnamon Meadows’ spectacular, High Sierra working ranch lands will continue to inspire generations to come.

At the base of Dunderberg Peak just south of Bridgeport, Sinnamon Meadows has been a high priority for ESLT and agency partners for several years. This is due to its historic agricultural value and the critical wildlife habitat it provides. Almost entirely surrounded by public lands, this unique property includes mountain meadows, aspen groves, coniferous forest, springs, and significant reaches of two creeks. “Sinnamon Meadows is simply a spectacular and special place. To know that people living 100 years from now will be able to enjoy these same vistas as you and I can admire today – that’s what really makes our success here meaningful,” commented ESLT Executive Director, Kay Ogden.

“My children are 4th generation cattle ranchers, and keeping our family and our land in the ranching business is very important to me,” said Bryan Masini, current property owner of Sinnamon Meadows. In 2012, Mr. Masini and his business partner approached ESLT to learn more about how they could permanently protect their land’s natural qualities, while retaining the ability to use the property for grazing as it has been for more than a century. “With the completion of this conservation easement with ESLT, we are excited that we will be able to continue to work our land for many years to come,” he added. “The experience and professional manner with which ESLT staff completed this complex project has continuously impressed my partner and me.”

Agricultural conservation easements on working farms and ranches such as Sinnamon Meadows provide a win-win situation for both landowners and the local community. Because the land remains in private ownership, it contributes to the local economy and tax base. Landowners are compensated for keeping their land in rural, low-intensity uses compatible with surrounding natural resources.

Situated above 8,000 feet in elevation, Sinnamon Meadows’ high-elevation irrigated pastures serve as critical habitat for many notable wildlife species, including the iconic and elusive Sierra Nevada Bighorn sheep. Comprised of over 40 animals, the Mt. Warren herd unit congregates on the south-facing slopes of Lundy Canyon in the summer months. Another species of particular conservation concern is the Bi-State population of greater sage-grouse, which depends on pastures where irrigation and sustainable grazing provide essential late summer habitat for raising their young. With its open spaces and working ranch land, Sinnamon Meadows provides an ideal environment for this ground-nesting bird which is currently under consideration for Threatened species status under the Endangered Species Act.

“The ranch – with its many meadows and healthy stands of sagebrush – provides just what sage grouse need to forage, hide from predators, nest, and raise their young. It’s no wonder a healthy population of the imperiled Bi-State population of the birds remains on the ranch.  The easement includes a plan to continue wise management practices that allow livestock and wildlife to happily coexist,” says Carlos Suarez, State Conservationist for NRCS in California.  “That’s an awesome outcome and one we are happy to help facilitate.”

Containing natural springs and important riparian habitat, ESLT’s new conservation easement on Sinnamon Meadows preserves the property’s vital resources, important wildlife habitat, and stunning views of Dunderberg Peak. Photo Credit: Stephen Ingram.
Containing natural springs and important riparian habitat, ESLT’s new conservation easement on Sinnamon Meadows preserves the property’s vital resources, important wildlife habitat, and stunning views of Dunderberg Peak. Photo Credit: Stephen Ingram.

Sinnamon Meadows’ rich cultural heritage also makes the preservation of this property particularly vital to the Eastern Sierra region. The area was used on Native American trade routes, and later became the location of the historic Dunderberg Mill and town of Munckton. It has been used as summer pasture since it was originally claimed under the Homestead Act by early prospectors – including the property’s namesake, early Mono County pioneer James Sinnamon – in the late 1850’s. Numerous historic Basque carvings dating back 100 years or more can still be found on the property. Sinnamon Meadows was even the setting of a western film, “Belle Starr’s Daughter,” made in the late 1940’s!

Funding for this project has been provided by the California Wildlife Conservation Board and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife; the Sierra Nevada Conservancy (SNC), an agency of the State of California; and the United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Support from these critical funding sources allowed ESLT to complete a conservation easement on the property. “These working landscapes have a rich and important place in our region, so preserving that heritage is critical to our future,” said SNC Executive Officer Jim Branham. “These lands provide not only economic benefits, but substantial natural resource benefits as well. These projects will help conserve or restore land and water resources valuable to those living downstream.”

“I am proud that ESLT has completed such a significant conservation success at Sinnamon Meadows,” said Bob Gardner, President of ESLT’s Board of Directors. “With its varied and unique landscape, vital habitat, and history as a working ranch, this stunning property represents why our work in the Eastern Sierra is so critical. Protecting these special places so that my grandchildren – and their grandchildren – can appreciate their wonders is truly the legacy of our work here. Thanks to our staff and board members, past and present, and our conservation partners who helped accomplish this great victory – not just for ESLT, but for the future of the Eastern Sierra.”

ESLT works with willing landowners to preserve vital lands in the Eastern Sierra for their scenic, agricultural, natural, recreational, historical, and watershed values. For more information about this and other permanent land conservation tools, visit ESLT’s website at www.eslt.org or call the ESLT office at (760) 873-4554.

This material is based upon work supported by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, under #73-9104-3-031. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

###

Breaking News: Historic Sinnamon Meadows Property now Permanently Protected by ESLT

http://www.kibskbov.com/eslandtrust/

Eastern Sierra Land Trust / ESLT / Eastern Sierra / Bishop / Historic Sinnamon Meadows / Protected / California Wildlife Conservation Board / Conservation / Success / Breaking News / California Department of Fish and Wildlife / Sierra Nevada Conservancy / United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)

Mammoth Community Water District: Update on Conservation Efforts

MCWD UPDATE ON CONSERVATION EFFORTS AND WATER SUPPLY

Water demand drops 25% in August and groundwater pumping supplies almost 75% of MCWD water supply during this year’s drought. 
 
Mammoth Lakes, CA – Last month, Mammoth Community Water District customers made a significant effort to conserve water, and as a result, water demand dropped 25% from previous years.  This conservation effort from our customers contributes directly to maintaining a reliable water supply during the extended drought.  Our water supply consists of a mix of surface water and groundwater, and recycled water is used for golf-course irrigation.  With severely drought-limited surface water supplies this year, our groundwater supply has been essential to meet customer’s needs. Groundwater production has supplied almost 75% of our water supply during peak demand this summer, from 53% in June to 74% in July and August. Contributions from surface water and recycled water contributed 18% and 8% respectively.
Heavy reliance on groundwater pumping has stressed our wells and resulted in reducing the production capacity of two of our nine production wells.  The largest user of water, outdoor irrigation demand, is expected to decrease in September as the days shorten and cooler temperatures return.  We would like to thank our customers for the significant saving in water to date and request that conservation efforts continue.  Level 1 water restrictions are still in effect:
·         Even numbered addresses irrigate on MondayWednesday and Saturday
·         Odd numbered addresses irrigate on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday
·         No irrigation between 10:00 am and 7:00 pm
·         A hose must be equipped with an automatic shut-off nozzle
·         No washing of hard surfaces is allowed unless for safety or health reasons
·         Leaks must be repaired within five days after notification from the MCWD
This year’s drought and heavy reliance on pumping underscores the importance of protecting our groundwater resources from potential adverse impacts of increased geothermal production by Ormat near our well locations.  These adverse impacts include polluting the groundwater and reducing the supply. The MCWD remains committed to pursuing a monitoring and mitigation plan for the geothermal plant expansion that protects our water resources and ensures the continued availability of a reliable water supply.
About Mammoth Community Water District 
MCWD provides water and wastewater utility service to the Town of Mammoth Lakes and surrounding areas.  MCWD strives to provide reliable, affordable utility service to our customers and to conduct our operations in a manner reflecting our stewardship role.  We encourage our customers to practice responsible use of our limited water resources, and to take advantage of the information and services available to support this goal.
###

MCWD UPDATE ON CONSERVATION EFFORTS AND WATER SUPPLY

http://www.kibskbov.com/mammothcommunitywaterdistrict/

Mammoth Lakes / California / Drought / Water / Conservation / Efforts / Projects / Mono County / Water Supply / Update

Saying Goodbye to Clara Armstrong

Clara Hofer Armstrong

Clara Armstrong
Clara Armstrong, the sparkle of the town’s social scene…

The town’s social scene has lost a bit of sparkle as Clara Armstrong has left our company for an engagement she simply couldn’t refuse.

She departed on Monday, September 8 to join the company of her mother, father, three sisters, husband of 45 years Jim, and best friend Gayle, for what we can only assume is one hell of a good party. 

Although her poofy orange curls will no longer bounce down Main Street as she makes her way to her weekly hair or nail appointment, she will always be remembered for her keen fashion sense and fabulous style. For her large, sparkly jewelry, for her outfits that matched from her socks to her handbag, and of course for her trademark full face of make up that she wouldn’t be caught dead without wearing.

And she wasn’t. 

As the paramedics loaded our beloved 97-year-old grandma into the ambulance on what would be the last day she would ever see, she shouted to her daughter, “Don’t forget my makeup!” We didn’t. And as she lay in the hospital bed, surrounded by family and friends from over the years who came to wish her a fond farewell, she looked absolutely perfect.

She is survived by her three children, James Armstrong (wife Rochelle), Marjorie Parsons (husband Chuck) and Marilyn Armstrong Jackson, as well as her five grandchildren, four great grandchildren, and a whole bunch more step and virtually-adopted family members, who will always remember to “Stand up straight!” just as Clara constantly reminded.

We will miss her amazing warmth, hilarious dirty jokes and monkey impression, delicious pecan butter cookies, and unhealthy distaste for the Republican Party. 

We will try our hardest to emulate her way of making a home feel so warm that no matter which part of the world it was located (she lived in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Tel Aviv, Iowa, Arkansas, New York, San Diego, Long Beach and Bishop) you were ensured that friends would always gather there. 

We will aim to break new ground, as she did when, as working as a nurse in World War II, she assisted in the first-ever bone graft procedure. 

We will thirst for adventure like she did at age 12 when she skipped school and hopped aboard a train to join the circus with Gayle.  

And we will strive to match her extraordinary sense of camaraderie and inclusiveness that resulted in everyone she loved (and there were hundreds) receiving a greeting card on every holiday. She never forgot a birthday, either. 

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that you donate to the Northern Inyo Hospital Auxiliary where Clara volunteered for the entire 21 years she lived in town and where she met some of her favorite bridge partners.

Everyone she ever met loved her. And she lived a fabulous life.

Until we meet again, little woman.

Clara Hofer Armstrong

http://www.kibskbov.com/armstrong-obituary/

Bishop / Eastern Sierra / KIBS KBOV Radio / Obituary / Donations / Northern Inyo Hospital Auxiliary 

City of Bishop Warren Street Improvement Projects

Public Works Department: Warren Street Utility Work this Fall

Public Works News Release

Water and sewer work is planned this fall in advance of the construction of the first phase of the City of Bishop Warren Street Improvements project next spring.

The $500,000 water and sewer project is intended to make needed underground improvements this fall prior to paving and improving the street next spring.

The water and sewer project will make water improvements at various locations along Warren Street and on West Elm Street near Main Street. In addition, new sewer will be constructed on Academy Avenue between Main and Warren and new waterlines will be
constructed along South Street and Academy Avenue between Main and Fowler Streets.

Work is expected to begin in early October and last through November. The contractor is Marzano and Sons of June Lake.

This construction in downtown Bishop will impact traffic on city streets west of Main Street. Traffic can be heavy so the work will cause inconvenience and delays.

Equipment, workers, and uneven pavement will require attention. All efforts will be made to maintain access to businesses and to minimize the impacts and restrictions, but drivers and pedestrians should be cautious, take alternate routes, and be patient.

For more information, contact City of Bishop Public Works at publicworks@ca-bishop.us or 760-873-8458.

Public Works Department: Warren Street Utility Work this Fall

http://www.kibskbov.com/warrenstreetbishop/

Bishop / Eastern Sierra / Utility Work / Public Works Department/ City of Bishop / Improvement Projects / This Fall / Contractors / June Lake / Warren Street / Public Notice / News Release

 

Meadow Fire Half Dome Yosemite

Meadow Fire at 4,906 Acres, 23 Percent Contained

Half Dome Cables Prepare for Weekend Reopening, Meadow Fire at 23 % Containment – Yosemite

#MeadowFire in Yosemite National Park increases in acreage, but also in containment.

UPDATE: 9/12/2014 – Meadow Fire held at 4,906 acres and now 50 % contained.

 

Dramatic photo of the #MeadowFire in #Yosemite National Park, courtesy of Susan Holt.
Dramatic photo of the #MeadowFire in #Yosemite National Park, courtesy of Susan Holt.

NPS Press Release Below

Yosemite News Release
September 11, 2014
For Immediate Release
Media Contacts:
Scott Gediman 209-372-0248
Kari Cobb 209-372-0529

Half Dome Cables in Yosemite National Park to Open Saturday, September 13, 2014

Meadow Fire at 4,906 acres, 23% Contained

The Half Dome Cables in Yosemite National Park will reopen to the public on Saturday, September 13, 2014.  The cables have been closed since Sunday night, September 7, due to a wildfire.  The Meadow Fire, located east of Half Dome and near Little Yosemite Valley, is currently at 4,906 acres and is 23% contained.
Yosemite National Park is continuing active suppression efforts on the fire.  Over 550 fire personnel are assigned to the fire, including fire crews from the National Park Service and the U. S. Forest Service.  Additionally, there are sevenaircraft dedicated to suppressing the fire.
The trail to Half Dome via Little Yosemite Valley is open to day-use only.  No overnight camping in any areas impacted by the fire is permitted.  All other area closures, including Little Yosemite Valley, Sunrise High Sierra Camp area, Echo Valley, and Clouds Rest, are still in effect.
Visible smoke in the early morning hours may be present in and around Yosemite Valley and the Half Dome Hike.  Visitors who are sensitive to smoke should consider rescheduling their hike to Half Dome or their visit to Yosemite National Park.  Visitors are urged to check the park’s website to get updated information on the smoke impacts to the park.  Updated information can be found at www.nps.gov/yose or http://www.nps.gov/yose/blogs/fireinfo.htm.
-NPS-
Stay informed on Twitter, too.

U.S. Forest Service providing 243 firefighters #MeadowFire incl 9 hotshot crews & 4 helicopters.

Our own Inyo Hotshots are among the USFS firefighters assigned to the #MeadowFire in Yosemite.

Meadow Fire Half Dome Yosemite
Meadow Fire near Half Dome, Yosemite

Half Dome Cables Prepare for Weekend Reopening, Meadow Fire at 23 % Containment – Yosemite

http://www.kibskbov.com/meadowfireyosemite/

National Park Service / Yosemite National Park / Meadow Fire / Containment / Inyo Hotshots / Half Dome / Wildfire / Wilderness / California / US Forest Service