All posts by Gary Young

TWO MANZANAR VOLUNTEERS HAVE BEEN RECOGNIZED WITH A NATIONAL AWARD

TWO MANZANAR VOLUNTEERS HAVE BEEN RECOGNIZED WITH A NATIONAL AWARD

 

According to a news release from Manzanar National Historic Site, each year, more than 440,000 people volunteer for the National Park Service (NPS). This year, from among them, the NPS recognized Manzanar Volunteers Saburo and Ann Sasaki with the prestigious Hartzog Enduring Service Award. NPS Director Jon Jarvis presented the award on August 9 in Washington, DC. Manzanar’s Superintendent Bernadette Johnson and Volunteer Coordinator Carrie Andresen joined Saburo and Ann for the ceremony.
 
Since 2005, the Sasakis have volunteered at Manzanar between mid-April and mid-June. Saburo spends most of his time talking with visitors, answering questions, and presenting interpretive and educational programs for up to 1500 people each year. Ann staffs the visitor center, assists with Manzanar History Association operations, and has completed dozens of major projects for Manzanar’s library, museum, archives, oral history, and photo collections. Together, they have volunteered more than 3,000 hours. They also present programs around the country.
In April 1942, Saburo was a 7-year-old farm boy in San Fernando when the US Army uprooted his family. For three years and seven months, the Sasakis—Family #3831— were among more than 11,000 Japanese Americans exiled to Manzanar. Saburo attended second, third, and fourth grades in the camp. The Sasakis left Manzanar in October 1945.
Saburo later met Ann in Cleveland, Ohio. They both went on to become engineers for General Motors. Today, they travel 2250 miles each way to Manzanar from their home in Rochester Hills, Michigan. While the distance is impressive, what is most exceptional is Saburo’s seven-decade journey from a childhood in Manzanar to serving as a National Park Service volunteer.
2016 bridges the celebratory 100th anniversary of the National Park Service and the 75th anniversary in 2017 of Japanese Americans being removed from their homes and communities. The Manzanar staff nominated Saburo and Ann for the Enduring Service award because there is no more fitting time to recognize two exceptional volunteers whose lives bridge these two contrasting milestones in U.S. history.
Congress established Manzanar National Historic Site in 1992. Since then, the National Park Service (NPS) has worked with scores of stakeholders to preserve and interpret Manzanar and its stories.  Today, more than 90,000 annual visitors explore the personal experiences of  communities incarcerated at Manzanar. The restored camp auditorium serves as a visitor center and houses extensive exhibits.
For more information about Manzanar, please call 760-878-2194 ext. 3310.

YOSEMITE WAIVES PARK ENTRANCE FEES FOR CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION

YOSEMITE WAIVES PARK ENTRANCE FEES FOR CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION

 

In Yosemite, tomorrow marks the 100th anniversary of President Woodrow Wilson’s signing of the NPS Organic Act that established the National Park Service as an agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior. Yosemite National Park will celebrate the Centennial by waiving park entrance fees starting tomorrow through Sunday, August 28th. Camping fees and all other fees will still be applicable. The park will host many special Centennial programs throughout the park on August 25th.

Special Centennial events include a hike to the top of Lembert Dome, a program on Stephen T. Mather and the Founding of the National Park Service, Horse-Drawn Stage rides, and tours of Pioneer Yosemite History Center. Yosemite National Park celebrated its 125th anniversary last year. The park welcomes 4 million visitors from around the world each year generating $535 million dollars in economic benefit to the local region.

The park is home to Yosemite Falls, the tallest waterfall in North America, and iconic rock formations such as Half Dome and El Capitan. The park also features approximately 90 different species of mammals and over 1500 species of flowering plants.

Dr. Terry McAteer Honored Once Again

Dr. Terry McAteer Honored Once Again

 

The office of Inyo County Superintendent of schools has honored its recently departed superintendent. Dr. Terry McAteers legacy will live on in Inyo County far into the future. After 8 years as Inyo County’s Superintendent of Schools, Dr. McAteer left a large footprint of local school development and successful implementation that will never be forgotten. Since his retirement as County Superintendent on July 2nd, the accolades have continued to roll in. The latest honor bestowed upon Dr. McAteer is located at the Jill Kinmont Boothe School where yesterday afternoon the local Board of Education sent Dr. McAteer off in style by renaming the schools Great Room as the Doctor Terry McAteer Room. The room is host to the new Keith Bright School, an educational facility for adjudicated juvenile detainees that was recently moved from Independence to save tax dollars, a move that was partially catalyzed  by Dr. McAteers influence. The new dedication of the room to bear McAteers name was symbolized with a plaque presented to Dr.McAteer by Board President Chris Langley. Dr. McAteer sets off next week for some well earned rest and relaxation as he and his wife take a European trip to Turkey, Greece, and the Baltic’s.

Girl Scout Information Night

Eastern Sierra Girl Scouts is hosting an Information Night and Mixer on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 from 6pm to 8pm at the Bishop Girl Scout House on South Fowler Street (behind the Boy Scouts House on Line Street). Please stop by if you would like to learn more about what our local Girl Scout Service Unit is doing this year. We are looking for volunteers! A recruitment specialist from Council will also be there if you are interested in joining. Light refreshments will be provided.

BISHOP AREA CHP WELCOMES 2 NEW OFFICERS

BISHOP AREA CHP WELCOMES 2 NEW OFFICERS

 

The Bishop California Highway Patrol area is pleased to welcome the arrival of two new officers. Officer Angel Salamanca and Officer Christopher Bol. Officer Salamanca is originally from Antioch and served in the United States Marine Corps. Officer Bol is originally from El Dorado and attended Folsom lake College.

Both officers recently completed a 28 week training course at the CHP academy in Sacramento, after which they were assigned to the Bishop Area office. Congratulations Officers Bol and Salamanca.

GREAT SIERRA RIVER CLEANUP

GREAT SIERRA RIVER CLEANUP

 

Eastern Sierra Land Trust is looking to cleanup the Pleasant Valley Campground. The Great Sierra River Cleanup is an annual occasion for communities throughout the Sierra Nevada to join together to help keep our local waterways clean. In its first seven years, over 30,000 volunteers removed over 850 tons of trash and recyclables from vital watersheds around the state. For this years Cleanup Day in the Eastern Sierra, join Eastern Sierra Land Trust on September 10th at Pleasant Valley Campground (off of Chalk Bluff Road) to help pick up trash along the Wild Trout stretch of the Owens River from 9-11 A.M. Volunteers should wear appropriate attire for working outdoors, including long sleeves, hat, and gloves. For more information and to RSVP, please call 760-873-4554.

Bishop Police Department Reporting a Brawl at Local Bar

Bishop Police Department

207 West Line Street
Bishop, California 93514

For Emergencies Dial 9-1-1

On August 20, 2016, at approximately 1:18 A.M., officers were dispatched to the 100 block of Main St. on a reported bar fight involving twenty subjects, with one possibly stabbed.

Officers met with the bouncer, who had confiscated a knife and pointed out the potential suspect as he was walking away from the bar. The suspect began running but was caught by police moments later. He was identified as 21-year-old Damen Martinez from Bishop.

The preliminary investigation tended to show two groups of individuals that may have begun arguing over a female, which escalated into the brawl. Two adults were treated as the hospital for sharp instrument wounds and released. Martinez was also treated and then booked into the Inyo County Jail charged with 245(a)(1) PC (assault with a deadly weapon), 647(f) PC (disorderly conduct), and 148(a)(1) PC (resisting arrest).

The investigation in ongoing. Anyone with information about this incident is encouraged to contact the Bishop Police Department either in person or by telephone: (760) 873-5866.

Reported by the Bishop police Department

 

#Bishop #Bishoppolice #brawl #stabbing

 

CEDAR FIRE UPDATE

CEDAR FIRE UPDATE

 

The Cedar fire which began last Tuesday afternoon is still only 5% contained and it is estimated that due to hot and dry weather conditions combined with the dry grass, brush, and dead timber that have been fueling the fire, the fire may not be fully contained until next week. The Owens Valley will continue to see smokey hazy skies as the Cedar Fire continues to burn in the Green Horn Mountains above Lake Isabella. There are currently close to 1200 personnel assigned to this fire which has now burned nearly 20,000 acres and is still gaining in strength at this time. However, there is a 40% chance of thunderstorms in the area today that could aid in containment of the fire which again is only 5% contained. Portions of Highway 155, Highway 90, and Highway 178 have closures in effect until further notice.

THUNDERSTORMS FOR THE EASTERN SIERRA

THUNDERSTORMS FOR THE EASTERN SIERRA

 

The Mono County Sheriffs office would like to announce that thunderstorms are currently in forecast for the Eastern Sierra over the next several days, with the highest probability of thunderstorms today. Such storms can cause flash flooding and rock slides in burn areas across the county. Residents, tourists and structures affected by recent fires are most at risk. Those affected should seek higher ground outside of the burn areas through the duration and immediately following a storm cell.

Travelers are advised to be attentive and cautious while traveling on Highway 395 North of Lee Vining – Marina Fire burn area and Lower Rock Creek road if there is an imminent threat of thunderstorms, during thunderstorms, or immediately after thunderstorms.

Travelers need to be aware of the risk for fast moving debris flows which have the potential to inundate the highway.

YOSEMITE EXPANDS AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAM

the walk

YOSEMITE EXPANDS AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAM

 

Yosemite National Park has expanded the American Sign Language Program offered to deaf and hearing impaired visitors. The park’s deaf services program offers trip planning, park orientation at the visitor center, and interpretive services for deaf and hearing impaired visitors.  The program also focuses on employee training in deaf/disability awareness and outreach to the deaf community.

The park was the first to establish and maintain a dedicated seasonal deaf services position in the National Park Service in 1979. In 2008, the National Park Service honored Yosemite with the NPS Programmatic Accessibility Achievement Award to recognize the Deaf Services program as one exemplifying the concept of universal accessibility. The addition of a Park Ranger dedicated to providing deaf services adds to Yosemite’s capacity to serve these visitors.

“We are very excited to be able to offer these expanded services to the deaf and hearing impaired community,” stated Don Neubacher, Park Superintendent. “It is our responsibility to serve all park visitors to the best of our abilities and these expanded services help us reach these visitors.”

To learn more about the Deaf Services program at Yosemite National Park, call 209-379-5250.